Sony’s grip on full-frame mirrorless sees them hold 42.6% market share in Japan

Feb 4, 2021

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Sony’s grip on full-frame mirrorless sees them hold 42.6% market share in Japan

Feb 4, 2021

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Despite the new models from Canon and Nikon over the last few months, Sony’s release of the A7C, A7S III and now the A1 have seen Sony take a massive lead in market share amongst full-frame mirrorless cameras in Japan. In stark contrast to the mere 25% share they held in April 2020, below both Nikon and Canon, Sony now holds 42.6%.

This is according to BCNRanking, who collates camera sales data from across Japan. Their latest ranking shows Sony actually dipping slightly from a recent high of 45% a few months ago, with Canon and Nikon both lagging behind at 31% and 21.3% respectively. Panasonic, the only other company specifically named in the chart is way behind at 2.8%.

It’s likely that the line which sharply rose in September 2019 and currently sits in second-to-last place, somewhere between 1-2% is Sigma, thanks for the Sigma FP. That remaining line in bottom place at less than 1% I suspect is Leica. Although my Japanese is a little rusty (or, non-existent), so, if you know better (or can confirm my guesses), let me know down in the comments.

Although Sony has made some great gains over hte competition in the last 18 months, last year still saw an overall shift down in sales of cameras as a whole. And they say that the market has definitely seen a shift away from DSLRs towards mirrorless cameras – a range for which Sony has been expanding quite nicely of late.

While Japan is not the world, Japan is the place that all of the full-frame mirrorless camera manufacturers (besides Leica) call home. The camera trends there often tend to drive each company’s direction and set the tone for trends throughout the rest of the world. And judging from what I’ve been seeing on social media lately, that seems to be the case.

[BNCRetail via Sony Alpha Rumors]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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4 responses to “Sony’s grip on full-frame mirrorless sees them hold 42.6% market share in Japan”

  1. Dušan DuPe Pethö Avatar
    Dušan DuPe Pethö

    Fuji?

    1. John Aldred Avatar
      John Aldred

      Dušan DuPe Pethö What full-frame cameras does Fuji make? :)

    2. Dušan DuPe Pethö Avatar
      Dušan DuPe Pethö

      Peter Zorkóczy netreba,má GFX100S

    3. Dušan DuPe Pethö Avatar
      Dušan DuPe Pethö

      oka,oka,oka…podpichoval som