Rip-Tie has a super strong alternative to gaffer tape with no sticky residue

Sep 24, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Rip-Tie has a super strong alternative to gaffer tape with no sticky residue

Sep 24, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Wrapping cables is probably the biggest pain in the backside of any kind of shoot that requires them. For photographers, that often means strobe power cables or maybe sync cords if you’re not using wireless triggers. For filmmakers you’ve got power cords, audio cords, HDMI cables, and all kinds of things.

Often, we just use gaffer tape, which ends up getting thrown away and replaced on every job. Or, perhaps, we use velcro, which still needs to be replaced regularly as they usually get lost. Rip-Tie has a better way of doing things that ensures your wraps don’t get lost, and they’ll probably live longer than your cable! We stopped by the Rip-Tie stand at IBC 2019 to find out more.

Rip-Tie’s premium Rip-Lock series of cable straps might look a lot like just regular velcro at first. But the biggest advantage they offer is that they lock onto your cables. Once securely attached to your cable, they’re not letting go on their own. I’ve been using a couple of these on some cables since the show, and they really hold well.

That they lock onto your cable means that wherever your cable goes, the Rip-Tie goes, so unless you lose your cable, you’re never going to lose your wrap. The Rip-Lock cables come in a number of different lengths and a range of colours, so you can co-ordinate for different departments or owners of cable on collaborations or multi-person jobs.

Of course, these things are going to last a while. And your cable might die before the Rip-Tie becomes useless. So, each pack comes with a “key” allowing you remove them from your cable so that you can attach them to another if required.

These aren’t the only products Rip-Tie makes. They also have an alternative to gaffer tape that works extremely well and has a lot of holding power. It’s called RipWrap, and you can see this in the photo at the top of this page just how strong it is as Udi and I try to pull two pieces apart.

It works on a similar principle to velcro, however, it’s as thin as gaffer tape but without any kind of adhesive, so no sticky residue. Sure, there’s no residue on quality gaffer tape, either, but there’s a lot of crap gaffer tape out there, and RipWrap only sticks to itself. The hold on this stuff is extremely strong, and I wish I had some kind of force gauge that would let me properly test its limits. It’s made from a Polyester/Polyethylene blend, and despite its strength, it’s very light and flexible.

Rip-Tie has a whole range of products, available in various sizes, lengths and colours, and you can see and buy them all here. Or, you can find out more on their website.

We are giving away over $5,000 of cinema gear: http://bit.ly/2LQE6gw
DIYP’s coverage of IBC2019 is sponsored by Syrp, Manfrotto, Zhiyun, and Spiffy Gear.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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One response to “Rip-Tie has a super strong alternative to gaffer tape with no sticky residue”

  1. CGSingleton Avatar
    CGSingleton

    John there is a test method for determining both the peel and sheer strength of hook & loop fasteners like this.
    The most typical one is ASTM D751 “StandardTest Method for Peel Strength (“T” Method) of Hook and Loop Touch Fasteners” that is conducted using a Universal Testing Machine that pulls the assembled
    fasteners apart in either of the two modes (peel or sheer).
    Peel is the force required to undo the fastener in the manner in which you would pull it apart in standard usage.
    Sheer is the force required for the fastener to fail when subjected to high axial loads, these are similar to a burst pressure.
    The component that usually fails (deteriorates) first is the loop side of the fastener. Therefore, the primary focus of the tests is usually on that part by repeatedly connecting the fasteners and pulling them apart with the test machine that measures and charts the failure characteristics over 100 or more cycles.

    This data allows analysis of both the initial fastener strength when new as well as the deterioration of that strength over the life of the fastener.
    PM me if you want me to conduct this test as a matter of scientific curiosity . . . but it is a destructive test that will destroy the sample material. If you want it tested I will need approximately 1-metre of Rip-Tie material and I will do it as time permits over the next month.

    BTW – I followed the Amazon link for Rip-Tie and noticed that many of the product variations are duplicates of those already available from Velcro . . . generally at less cost.

    CGSingleton
    Canadian Photographer and Technical Manager of Product Development