Quick Tip: How to never lose track of charged & discharged batteries again

Jan 27, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Jan 27, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Keeping track of batteries is a pain. We have to change them so much more often in our cameras now. Especially since the advent of live view LCDs and video. So, most of us keep a well stocked supply of spares, particularly with small juice suckers like action cameras. But when you go out to shoot, how do you keep track of which are charged and which are depleted?

One option is to keep separate sections of a bag, or even separate bags for each. But things can often get mixed up easily. You could just write numbers on them and just use them sequentially, but that’s easy to lose track of. Here’s a solution from Knoptop that’s simple and pretty effective, just using some small rubber bands.

YouTube video

This quick tip uses cheap silicone bands. All you need to do, is pick a colour. As each battery charges up to full, stick a band around it and pop it in your bag. You have to take the band off in order to fit it into your camera, so when it it dies, and goes back into your bag, it remains bandless. No band = no power.

I’ve done similar in the past using gaffer tape. If it has a small square of white gaffer tape stuck to it, it’s fully charged and ready to go. If it doesn’t, it’s dead and needs recharging.

I’ve also had batteries organised into multiple bags to keep them separated. A black one for fully charged batteries, and a red one for dead batteries. But, you do need to be careful with that, it’s easy to get mixed up.

What do you do to quickly identify which of your batteries are ready to go and which are dead while out shooting?

[DIY GoPro Battery Bands! Quick Tip | Knoptop via ISO1200]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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7 responses to “Quick Tip: How to never lose track of charged & discharged batteries again”

  1. Vincent Ho Avatar
    Vincent Ho

    Good little tip. :)
    Always the simple things that helps

  2. Galonii August Avatar
    Galonii August

    I have battery cases one siDE is green and one side is blue dead batteries go in the blue side

  3. Jyi Offer Avatar
    Jyi Offer

    I 3D printed colour caps for em ;)

  4. Andreas Raun Arneberg Avatar
    Andreas Raun Arneberg

    OR OR OR OR just put a green piece of duct tape on the end ;) and when the batteri is done slap it on the side :D why spend money on silicone bands, and then try not to snap them or loose and keep track on them ;)

    1. lgorjup Avatar
      lgorjup

      Where I live duct tape also costs money :)

  5. Ray Otero Avatar
    Ray Otero

    I shoot with the Sony A6000, mainly sports. Five batteries is what I always carry no matter where I go. My batteries are numbered from 1-5 on the back, I’ll obviously start with battery numbered 1 in camera, at the end of shooting if I have battery numbered 3 in camera I know that 1 and 2 are dead – 4 and 5 haven’t been used. Beats separating them

  6. TheOriginalKaren Avatar
    TheOriginalKaren

    i used sharpie pen and numbered each battery. Works just as good and doesnt cost as much