Photographer recreates famous brand ads to point out to the lack of diversity in the industry

Dec 9, 2016

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Photographer recreates famous brand ads to point out to the lack of diversity in the industry

Dec 9, 2016

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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We are surrounded by commercials, promotional images and all sorts of advertising material. Most of us take it for granted and doesn’t think much about the message these materials send. But an L.A. based photographer, Raffael Dickreuter, paid attention to advertising campaigns of famous brands and noticed something very negative about them – they lack diversity.

Raffael points out that most famous brands rarely use black models in their advertising campaigns. With help of his model Deddeh Howard, he created a project called “Black Mirror”. He reshot famous campaign images with a black model to show that it could work as well.

In his project, Raffael used promotional photos from the last couple of years. He recreated the ads of world’s leading brands such as Dolce & Gabbana, Victoria’s Secret, Gucci, Chanel, Guess, Louis Vuitton, to name a few.

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In his photos, you can see that he paid attention to every detail. He aimed to set the lighting as in the original images, together with the locations and props, as well as clothes and poses of the model. He even paid attention to match the hairstyles and make up with the original photos.

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As a result of this effort, Raffael has created a truly remarkable project. It is not about the artistic or technical quality of the photos, even though they include these components as well. What’s more important is that Raffael sent a strong message and pointed out to the issue that really exists in the fashion industry. Take a look at more photos below.

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About the artist

Raffael Dickreuter is a designer and photographer based in Los Angeles, CA. He has a diverse professional background in film visual effects, design, web, advertising and photography. You can view the “Black Mirror” project here, and more of his work on his website and Behance.

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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12 responses to “Photographer recreates famous brand ads to point out to the lack of diversity in the industry”

  1. Michelle C Brown Avatar
    Michelle C Brown

    Looks good and all but still not a whole lot of diversity.

  2. Steph Avatar
    Steph

    in almost every example, the African American model makes for the better image.

    1. Owen Avatar
      Owen

      I actually preferred the originals :)

  3. TheInconvenientRuth Avatar
    TheInconvenientRuth

    (Note: I originally left this comment on PetaPixel, but they chose not to publish it. I don’t see anythign offensive in this post and I think my question is fair and to the point.)

    The cynical person in me (and that’s about 137% of me) just want to ask her:

    “if this is truly about promoting racial diversity in the fashion industry,
    why did you choose a highly succesful white male 30?-something
    photographer for this project?”

    (Waiting for someone to reply that “color or race has nothing to do with this..”)

    I think it’s just a convenient and lazy way to draw attention to herself and get some free publicity under the pretext of standing up for diversity.

    As a “race: other(s)” person myself I get sick of people ‘proving’ that they can do what ‘white folks’ can do by copying them. And then using that as ‘proof’ that they should be picked instead.

    Stop that shit. Seriously. Stop it.
    Impress ‘them’ by making something better, more original and more interesting by yourself.
    Impressing others by closely copying their original ideas went out of fashion in 3rd grade.

    1. Steve Biko Avatar
      Steve Biko

      I’m African/Black and I agree with you completely. If it were me, I’d “prove them wrong” by making a series which is even better than the first one. There’s no need for a carbon copy, or using a “white” photographer.

      That being said, the photographer is her boyfriend, so it’s obvious that she/they are trying to generate attention towards themselves/herself.

      1. TheInconvenientRuth Avatar
        TheInconvenientRuth

        Ah, that clarifies a lot, I hadn’t heard of either of them before so read up on them but hadn’t seen the relationship part mentioned anywhere.

  4. jcon Avatar
    jcon

    Artist launches campaign to promote racial diversity in ads.
    Proceeds to only use one race.
    SMH

  5. catlett Avatar
    catlett

    Artist launches campaign to get attention under the guise of diversity then proceeds to use models with hairstyles exactly like the caucasian models.

    A serious question. Does anybody really believe that the companies doing the advertising are purposefully avoiding diversity OR are they using advertising specifically for their known target buyers?

    There is zero obligation for companies to be diversified in their advertising. They are paid by their stock holders to make money, not to be diverse and advertise to every diverse group.

  6. WillMondy Avatar
    WillMondy

    Hopefully they will make a series of them, with a diverse range of models, Asian, Latino, mixed-race etc.

    We all know advertising is biased, and is trying to sell an impossible dream, especially car adverts with long empty winding roads that are usually nose to tail traffic jams.

  7. Dustin Gariepy Avatar
    Dustin Gariepy

    Do really think that these companies don’t spend tons on researching their consumers? Advertisements are strategically aimed. If a Company or retailer thought a slug would sell more of their product, you’d see slugs everywhere. Anyone can pick through thousands of images and pick out the ones with white women in them and recreate them. How many images of other races where passed over? In fact the first photo on this post is of a Latin woman! Being the highest paid model in the world doesn’t make Giselle white. Half of Victoria Secret’s models are women of color, why single them out? Calvin Klein has used all different types of models over the years. Dolce & Gabbana actually have a collection of luxury Muslim wear for women, gasp! It’s all about selling product and higher end products are purchased by people that can afford them and those more often are white people. So if you want to make a difference, do something to make achieving wealth easier for people of every color.

    1. Renlish Avatar
      Renlish

      Um. There are precisely TWO dark skinned Victoria Secret models currently in the official angels list, Dustin. TWO. With a couple vaguely Latina-looking girls thrown in, you know, for “diversity”.

      And sadly, while true, you have pointed out the problem. Very few fashion houses are brave enough to go mainstream with campaigns using dark-skinned models or models from varied cultures. D&G have a Muslim women’s range? Oh really? Why do you think they not widely advertise that fact? Advertising companies aren’t brave enough to try to change the fact that white sells to white. It’s the norm because they keep pushing. the. same. shit. over and over again.

  8. Renlish Avatar
    Renlish

    Great reproductons – but using the same woman doesn’t really show diversity. She’s just a prettier result than most of the original photographs.