These are NASA’s mind-blowing photos of 2017 solar eclipse

Aug 22, 2017

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

These are NASA’s mind-blowing photos of 2017 solar eclipse

Aug 22, 2017

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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The solar eclipse is over, but the hype isn’t. As a matter of fact, some of us living far from North America are even more hyped after the eclipse – because now we get to see the photos. And where can you find lots of awesome photos of space? In NASA’s image library, of course. They have published the images of the 2017 solar eclipse right after the event, and as you can expect – they are simply stunning.

On Monday, August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse was visible in a part of the USA from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North America, along with some parts of South America, Africa, and Europe.

In the gallery, you can see the close-up images of the Sun during the transition of the Moon. I found these particularly powerful. Of course, there are also photos of the totality and Baily’s beads effect. There is also a landscape composite showing the progression of the eclipse, and the panoramic shot of the partial eclipse at Nasa’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. And of course, the eclipse viewed from space.

Take a look at the photos, and if you’ve missed the eclipse, these will probably give you a decent consolation.

The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
This composite image, made from seven frames, shows the International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)
The International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
Image of the Moon transiting across the Sun, taken by SDO in 171 angstrom extreme ultraviolet light on Aug. 21, 2017. Photo Credit: NASA/SDO
Image of the Moon transiting across the Sun, taken by SDO in 171 angstrom extreme ultraviolet light on Aug. 21, 2017.Photo Credit: NASA/SDO
A total solar eclipse is seen Monday, August 21, 2017 from Idaho Falls, Idaho. Image Credit: NASA/David Cantillo
The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun at the point of the maximum of the partial solar eclipse near Banner, Wyoming on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)
A total solar eclipse is seen on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. Photo Credit: NASA/Aubrey Gemignani
The Bailey’s Beads effect is seen as the moon makes its final move over the sun during the total solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)
The last glimmer of the sun is seen as the moon makes its final move over the sun during the total solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, 2017 above Madras, Oregon. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)
As millions of people across the United States experienced a total eclipse as the umbra, or moon’s shadow passed over them, only six people witnessed the umbra from space. Viewing the eclipse from orbit were NASA’s Randy Bresnik, Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson, ESA (European Space Agency’s) Paolo Nespoli, and Roscosmos’ Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy. The space station crossed the path of the eclipse three times as it orbited above the continental United States at an altitude of 250 miles.
This panoramic view of the partial solar eclipse was taken from the roof of the aircraft hangar at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The eclipse in Hampton was about 85 percent of totality. Photo Credit: NASA Langley/Harlen Capen and George Homich
This composite image shows the progression of a partial solar eclipse over Ross Lake, in Northern Cascades National Park, Washington on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

[via NASA]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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2 responses to “These are NASA’s mind-blowing photos of 2017 solar eclipse”

  1. Angie Dutton Avatar
    Angie Dutton

    Yep!

  2. veryferry Avatar
    veryferry

    I’ve seen better