Four ways to fix a shiny polaroid print

Jul 4, 2022

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Four ways to fix a shiny polaroid print

Jul 4, 2022

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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fix shiny polaroid print

If you’re like me, you largely prefer matte prints over glossy ones. And if you use an instant camera, you’ll get the super-shiny prints that you wish were matte.

Dave Knop a.k.a. knoptop will help you to make your wish come true. He suggests three methods for mattifying your shiny polaroid prints, with one of them being pretty unordinary. And as a bonus, and I’ll also suggest one of my own ideas.

YouTube video
  1. A matte sleeve: I used to use plastic sleeves like these for Magic the Gathering cards to keep them protected. And you can also use them for making your instant prints matte. It’s an instant (pun not intended) solution, and it’s reversible if you want your prints to be shiny again.
  2. Matte spray: you can add a thin, even coat of matte acrylic finish over your print. It knocks down the glare and has a bit of a texture (which you may or may not like, I do). On the minus side, it takes some time to dry.
  3. Steel wool: this is the method I find pretty unusual, but it works. Dave uses a very fine, grade 0000 steel wool to rub it over the photo. You can do it in a circular motion or by alternating directions: up-down, left-right. On the minus side, there’s a lot of room for error and it’s permanent, but it looks okay and it’s ready to go, no need to wait for it to dry.
  4. The method I’d try is using matte acrylic varnish. I use it for jewelry, it knocks down the glare, protects the surface, and dries of very quickly (it’s dry to touch in about 20 minutes). Use a soft, flat brush to apply a thin layer of varnish to the print, wait for it to dry, and that’s it. I haven’t tried it, it just crossed my mind that it could be done – but if you give it a shot, let me know if it works.

Have you ever tried mattifying your instant prints? Have you used any of these techniques or you have some of your own to share?

[Your Instant Photos will NEVER look the same after THIS! |knoptop]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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