Have you found your inner artist?

Aug 8, 2017

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Have you found your inner artist?

Aug 8, 2017

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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Photographer Joshua Cripps is one of those artists whose words inspire me to think about my own work. And his latest challenge has definitely made me start thinking and re-evaluating my photography.

The challenge is this: look through the most recent photos in your portfolio and ask yourself: “are these photos the product of my unique artistic vision or could any photographer have done this?” After this question, my thoughts started unraveling. And with the same question in mind, Joshua wrote an interesting article that could also make you reevaluate your work and become even better at what you do.

In his blog post, Joshua doesn’t focus only on the “copycats” and the popular photo editing styles, locations and even compositions that appear in tons of photos online. It’s more about the lack of vision, which seems to be often present in the market that’s oversaturated with photographers. It looks like many artists rather produce work that’s similar to someone else’ than create something that reflects their own vision and emotion. And because of this, Joshua asks: “Has photography really become that interchangeable from person to person? Or are we becoming less willing to step outside the accepted norm of photography in pursuit of likes and thumbs-ups?”

Of course, these photos aren’t bad. They aren’t unappealing. But the thing is – there’s a lack of diversity of personal styles. None of us is immune to accepting what’s popular, and it’s not necessarily wrong. But what can really make you stand out is following your own ideas and vision.

Ask yourself: “is this a photo only I could have taken?” I have, and my answer is: “Oh, I still have so much to grow.” What’s your answer? Are you pleased with your work at the moment, or you feel your artistic vision still has a long way to go?

You can read the full article on Joshua’s blog. Also, make sure to visit his website, and follow him on Facebook and Instagram.

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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5 responses to “Have you found your inner artist?”

  1. James P Avatar
    James P

    While it is easy to agree with the sentiment of each of us embracing our inner artist, the idea that our styles will all be so unique as to be completely distinguishable from all other artists is unrealistic.

    I mean I really like Joshua Cripps, but looking at his portfolio, I see many images that could be made by myself and other photographers. Does that mean that Josh didn’t listen to his inner artist? Does that mean that I’m not allowed to make a photo similar because he was there first? I think the answer to both of those is no.

    Two people can see the same style of beauty. Sure, be inspired by others’ work and then make it your own, but don’t get caught up worrying about if somebody else could make the same image. Just enjoy your own process.

    1. Jimmy Harris Avatar
      Jimmy Harris

      I think you missed the point. All he’s saying is you should explore your own path to realize your own potential. Be the best “you” you can be. It’s basically a motivational piece, not a critique on style.

      1. James P Avatar
        James P

        Jimmy, if that was “all he was saying” then who would disagree? I was specifically addressing the qualifying question offered in this piece, “Ask yourself: “is this a photo only I could have taken?”” <-and to that I disagree.

        1. Jimmy Harris Avatar
          Jimmy Harris

          I think we interpreted that question differently. To me, it’s not a literal question of taking a photo that is impossible for anyone else to take. But rather, it’s a question of are you putting a piece of yourself into your work. Do you have a vision and are you trying to realize it, or are you just setting up a camera at a predetermined location, framing using the rule of thirds, metering with the zone system, and pressing the shutter? It’s the difference between photographing a beautiful scene, and photographing what you find beautiful in a scene. The technical stuff serves the vision, it does not supplant it.

          I personally did not find his work to look like any other photographer’s that I’ve yet seen. His work seems to capture a quiet, almost ethereal atmosphere that juxtaposes the awesome powers of nature and time. The scenes are often grand, but made palpable and personal. I feel drawn to a shared sense of isolation. I don’t think many other photographers would emphasize these qualities in quite the same way if they were on these same locations. That’s what I got from them anyway. Like the question in question, it’s all subject to our own interpretations.

          1. James P Avatar
            James P

            Definitely agree with you here. But it’s also okay if what you are drawn to ends up looking similar to what others are drawn to. That’s okay, and the qualifying question might mislead some to think that it’s not.

            1.Put the you in your art. Completely. 2.Make sure it doesn’t look like anyone else. Sure, if you are trying to push your brand, but not necessary as long as you are following #1.