DxO launches the Nik Collection v2.5 with new film simulations and Affinity Photo compatibility

Feb 27, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

DxO launches the Nik Collection v2.5 with new film simulations and Affinity Photo compatibility

Feb 27, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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The Nik Collection has had a pretty turbulent and uncertain journey over the last few years. Google acquired it in 2012 when they bought out Nik Software to get their hands on Snapseed, but they didn’t do much with it. In 2017, Google abandoned it and had no plans to continue it beyond Adobe CC15. Just a few months later it was acquired by DxO, cleaned up, and last year they released Nik 2.

Now, DxO has announced the Nik Collection 2.5, which comes with five new film type simulations, some of which are no longer available as actual film, and added support for Affinity Photo.

The new film simulations feature some old (and new) favourites, including some that are no longer in production as actual real film. DxO says that each one has been “carefully selected for its chromatic intensity and fine grain”.

  • AGFA Precista CT100
  • Fujifilm FP-100C
  • Fujifilm INSTAX
  • Fujichrome Provia 400X
  • Lomography Redscale 100

Fuji’s FP-100C & Provia 400X along with Agfa’s Precista CT 100 stopped being manufactured between 2005 and 2016. These days, you can usually only find old expired film on the used market, if you’re lucky. The new simulations allow you to get those kinds of looks with you digital shots.

The big news with Nik Collection 2.5, though is support for Affinity Photo. DxO says it’s fully compatible with Affinity Photo 1.8, the newest version of the editing software. Ashley Hewson, Managing Director at Serif says that compatibility with the Nik Collection has been one of their most requested features by customers. As always, the Nik Collection still works with Adobe Photoshop, too.

The Nik Collection 2.5 for PC and Mac is available to download on the DxO website for $149/£125 ($80/£69 upgrade for Nik Collection 2018 by DxO users). Nik Collection 2 by DxO users can upgrade to 2.5 for free.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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4 responses to “DxO launches the Nik Collection v2.5 with new film simulations and Affinity Photo compatibility”

  1. Dušan DuPe Pethö Avatar
    Dušan DuPe Pethö

    rip-off

    1. Huge Dom Avatar
      Huge Dom

      Before Google, Nik was selling for twice as much as DxO is asking now and it was still one of the more competitive offer compared others out there even now. Plus, it is still a one time purchase.

  2. Albin Avatar
    Albin

    Actually Google never touched the original Nik suite during its ownership, and made it available for free download – for that whole period of years, the version number for the suite never changed at all. Nik has some very good elements, but is odd to use with separated stand alone modules, as opposed to running it as a plug-in set within Adobe, etc. After its acquisition, DxO immeidately started selling pretty much the same suite with minimal incremental changes – it’s about time it did serious work on the suite given what it’s charging for it. (A lot of good film simulations are freely available as Look Up Tables (LUTs) for a variety of RAW editors, including free ones like Darktable and RAWTherapee.)

  3. Jonathan C Riley Avatar
    Jonathan C Riley

    Peter Morley is what you use?