Considering a Godox? Here is what you need to know about power

Apr 5, 2017

Robert Hall

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Considering a Godox? Here is what you need to know about power

Apr 5, 2017

Robert Hall

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

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In 2016 I adopted the Godox X series, specifically the Godox AD600 and the V860II speedlights. Later I added the AD360II as a portable option. While I was satisfied with that product lineup, they kept adding new releases that intrigued me. Eventually, I added the H600B and H1200B, as well as the AD200 pocket flash and QT600II studio strobe. One thing I’m often asked in groups is how the output compare between the products. While w/s ratings tell us the amount of power the light draws from the battery, it doesn’t convert to light output perfectly (think about an inefficient strobe, for example, lots of W/S, not a  lot of light). By metering lights at the same distance with the same modifiers, we can truly tell the power difference between products.

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The Godox V860-ii and AD200 (with fresnel head) both had some inflated results, as the narrow beam they emit (both were at zoom 35mm) concentrates the pattern of light. While this is useful when trying to squeeze power out of a small light source, it’s important to realize they will not give you the same quality of light that you will get from an omnidirectional bulb.

My biggest takeaway from this test, is the small difference between the Godox AD360ii and the AD200 with its omnidirectional head. The AD360ii only had a .6 stop power difference than the AD200 in both tests. While I think the AD360 is still a great piece of gear, I do think the AD200’s added portability, fresnel head option, and substantially cheaper price tag make it a far better purchase. Personally, my AD360ii will now be left to a lonely studio life.

This test also provided me with some insight into how much power you lose with the H600B and H1200B remote heads. The H600B plugs into a Godox AD600, giving you a 9 foot extension head, to keep your bulky AD600 low to the ground. The H1200B is the same, although it uses two AD600’s for power and provides a maximum 1200w/s power output. Unfortunately, all the cable comes at a price, and a little power is lost along the way. The H600B lost .2-.3 stops of power in comparison to the AD600 in the same modifier. The H1200B metered .7-.8 stops above a single AD600 as well. So you can assume the added security of the remote head will costs you about 1/3 rd stop of power output. The H1200B is a ridiculously powerful piece of equipment. Even when used in HSS at a significant distance, bright skies will bow down to you.

This power test was also my first experience with taking the QT600ii out of the box. This new flash is being heralded for it’s super fast maximum flash duration (1/28,984s t.1), but it’s no slouch in the power department either. It metered 2/10 of a stop more powerful than the AD600 in the softbox test, and matched power in a reflector. There are two things I noticed about this strobe that make me very excited for the future of Godox. First, despite being larger than the AD600, they updated the handle to get rid of the annoying clicky handle. Second, they used a horseshoe style bulb instead of the helical tube found on the AD600/AD360ii/AD200. This shows me they are considering the feedback of their product users and making improvements as they move forward.

I still think the AD600 is the best to use as a location strobe, at least when balancing large light sources with bright skies in HSS.  The AD200 is powerful for it’s size, but it’s definitely not a replacement for a monolight. Beyond my personal thoughts, I just wanted everyone to have reliable information that you could use to determine which strobe will fit your power needs.

About the Author

Robert Hall is a wedding and commercial photographer based in Southeast Michigan. You can find more of his work on his website, Instagram, and YouTube, and connect with him on his Facebook page

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5 responses to “Considering a Godox? Here is what you need to know about power”

  1. Kryn Sporry Avatar
    Kryn Sporry

    The product range impresses me. If I hadn’t bought into Profoto I would most definitely get something from the Godox range.

  2. Jason Collin Avatar
    Jason Collin

    Thank you for this comparison. It was very useful and now shows me why results with the V860II in softboxes are not that great! I just switched over to all Godox, and I need the two V860IIs for on camera anyway for events, but now see for real portability I will need a pair of AD200s. I got the AD600 at the same time as the V860II and like it a lot, but it is very heavy, and as mentioned, the handle is not easy to use.

  3. Leslie Pujiono Avatar
    Leslie Pujiono

    One question, when you measure the power in the chart above, how fast was your shutter speed setting? I wonder if the ad600 could deliver enough light to freeze water drops, exploding baloon or bulb. Thx for the great info.

    1. jaclu Avatar
      jaclu

      When you measure the max brightness of a flash, you use a light meter, so no camera is involved, thus shutter speed isn’t the right question for such tests :)
      For the speed of flashes, normally it’s about the power output, the lower the power, the faster the flash is. On most Godox flashes they display the flash duration, and in many tests those figures have been concluded to be fairly honest. As long as you don’t expose for ambient light, the shutter speed is of little importance to freeze movement with flash light.

  4. PaloAltoMark Avatar
    PaloAltoMark

    Hi Robert. Perhaps I’m not understanding the chart correctly. In the post, you write that there’s only a .6 stop difference between the AD360 and the AD200. However, when I look at the table for the softbox test, it looks like the aperture value for the AD200 was f8 and the AD360 was f11. Isn’t that a full stop difference, not .6 stops?