Why spending too much money on your first camera is a wrong decision

Mar 15, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Why spending too much money on your first camera is a wrong decision

Mar 15, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

Many newbie photographers believe that the better camera they buy, the better photos they’ll take. However, spending a bunch of money on your first camera could be a huge mistake if you’re new to photography. So, before you go and spend plenty of cash on your first camera, watch this video by James Popsys and rethink your decision.

YouTube video

As James points out, many newbies are putting too much focus on the camera when they want to step into the world of photography. Naturally, this also means investing too much money into their very first camera. However, this can be a big mistake if you’re just starting out because the camera isn’t the only item you’ll need (nor it will be responsible for good photos).

Aside from the camera, you’ll also need lenses, a tripod a bag, props, and accessories. If you want to shoot at different locations, count some money in for travel expenses. I guess you also want to learn and improve your skills. So, you might want to enroll in workshops and courses, and it also costs money. And if you spend all of your savings on a high-end camera, that’s the only thing you’ll have until you save up again. It can actually make your progress slower because you won’t be able to pay for education, travel and all other things that help you improve. As James puts it: “great photos take investments outside the camera.”

How to solve this? Well, you should buy the camera, of course. But make sure that the budget for the camera sits within your overall photography budget, not to make all of it. Make sure you’ve got money left to spend on other things as well. And upgrade your gear as you upgrade your skills.

I remember writing about how being poor helps you improve photography. So if your photography budget doesn’t cover some of the latest high-end cameras and all the other expenses James mentions, you might want to read it. There are some benefits of taking it slow and gradually upgrading, so think again whether you want to squander your entire budget on the latest, high-end camera.

[The BIGGEST Beginner Photography Mistake via FStoppers]

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

4 responses to “Why spending too much money on your first camera is a wrong decision”

  1. Sascho de Beer Avatar
    Sascho de Beer

    My first dslr was a Nikon D70 about 10 years ago. It was already pretty cheap back then but I could barely afford it. But ever since I loved it and it kinda hurt, when it broke even if I didn’t use it anymore :(

  2. Tj Ó Seamállaigh Avatar
    Tj Ó Seamállaigh

    This is what i usually say to people asking me “what’s the best camera to buy?” – unfortunately, none of them listens. I’ve gone through some levels starting from a 6 megapixels camera till I got my 7D in 2010 – and I’m still using it and quite satisfied with it. The main thing is to train your eyes to “see.”

  3. Jeff Cooper Avatar
    Jeff Cooper

    I started off with, and still use, a Canon Rebel T5 that I purchased Certified Refurbished. I am looking to move onto a real Big Boy camera soon, but am definitely glad I picked something cheaper to start off with. I didn’t know I would genuinely enjoy photography as much as I do, AND when I do move onto something better, I am not abandoning a $900 purchase. I’m setting aside something much less of an investment and the improvement in camera quality will be even bigger. It is a no-brainer to move onto something bigger and objectively better when it makes sense to. If I had a more expensive camera, I’d spend a long time hemming and hawing over an upgrade and ultimately be less satisfied (and a lot poorer) with a top tier camera since the differences would be smaller. On top of that, it will feel pretty wasteful to have a more expensive camera sitting around doing nothing at all.

    As it is now, an upgraded camera will open whole new avenues and vistas for me.

  4. Rick Scheibner Avatar
    Rick Scheibner

    I’ve been saying this for a long time now: If you can’t make decent pics with an entry level Rebel–even an older used one–you need to rethink your approach to photography.