Watch the Sony A7R II being built from scratch in the Sony’s Thailand factory

Mar 22, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Mar 22, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Seeing how things are made is a subject that fascinates all kinds of people. In fact, it’s such a popular topic that it spawned an entire TV show. So for photographers, seeing how the gear gets made that we use on a daily basis is, naturally, rather intriguing. It’s usually lensesoccasionally drones, but rarely cameras.

We often assume that many production lines are filled with robots these days. But, that’s not the case with the construction of the Sony A7R II, as this video from ShutterBug Mag shows. While I’m sure they’re using automated systems to build the circuit boards, the final construction is all done by hand.

YouTube video

The process looks to begin with a series of jigs and templates to hold items in place for initial construction.

Rather than a sequential start-to-finish build process, adding one component at a time, different sections of the camera appear to be built separately. Then those parts are all brought together for attachment to the frame.

Once the cameras are constructed, they’re hooked up to various machines. Some look like they might be installing or updating firmware. Others appear to be to test various aspects of the camera, such as colour, focus, and exposure.

While there’s no narration in the video, or description of what certain processes entail, it’s an interesting look at just what goes into the construction of a Sony camera.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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