Turkish artist creates collages that send a powerful message to society

Jan 16, 2019

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Turkish artist creates collages that send a powerful message to society

Jan 16, 2019

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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We have all seen powerful images of conflicts, riots, and wars all over the world. They are striking on their own, but Turkish artist Uğur Gallenkuş puts them into collages that make them strike you even more. His project Paralel Evren is a series of collages, each created only from two images. But the photos are juxtaposed so cleverly, that they’ll hit you hard and make you think of the world we live in.

Before we proceed, I must warn you that some images are not suitable for sensitive viewers, so keep this in mind before you scroll down.

Uğur lives in Istanbul, Turkey, and he has been creating collages simply as a hobby. He started doing it in 2014, and as he told DIYP, at first he was focused on the events specific to Turkey and Turks.

For decades, tens of wars and conflicts have come and gone in South America, the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. We have seen the visuals of these through books, magazines, and televisions. We see these wars in Iraq and Syria, in our neighbors. Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan have been the transit route and destination for millions of refugees trying to move to Europe for a better life, peace and future through Turkey.

I asked Uğur what made him start creating these striking collages, considering that his work is pretty versatile and deals with other topics, too. Perhaps you remember the devastating image of Alan Kurdi, a 3-year-old Syrian boy who drowned in 2015 in the Mediterranean Sea. One morning, Uğur saw this photo of the young boy, who was one of the thousands of drowned people. This was the moment when he decided to do this kind of work.

When it comes to the creative process, I was eager to learn more. I noticed that Uğur mainly uses stock images and iconic photos and combines them to stock images. I wanted to know if he starts with an idea/story in mind and then searches for a perfect pair of images or the process of creating looks different. The artist told me that he finds all the photos for his work by browsing the internet. First, he sees the image of war or other bad events. And then, he finds another image according to his feeling. All images are perfectly aligned. In my opinion, this doesn’t only make them visually captivating, but it makes them even more impactful.

A ball of fire is seen following an Israel air strike on Gaza City at May 25, 2019.
By Mahmoud F. Ajjour

With his work, Uğur wants to send a message to both Eastern and Western societies. Both of them should know that the world they live in isn’t the only one and that none of them is perfect. But also, while one part of the world suffers today, it doesn’t mean that the other part will live in peace forever.

The Western and Eastern words I will mention are not Muslim, Christian, Jewish etc. South America is not East, but the United Arab Emirates is not West, but the conditions are different. While living in luxury, peace, and waste, I wanted to remind the inhabitants of the West that the East lived in pain, hunger and war.

I wanted to remind the East residents why they could not find a better government, education, and science. I want to give the message to the inhabitants of the east that they can be as strong and peaceful as the west. The problem of the modern world; greed, injustice, as long as societies can’t make themselves more judgmental and fair, these problems will not be over. That, of course, causes fear. We are not the ones who suffer today, but tomorrow there is no guarantee that we will not be the target.

Uğur cites Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the founder of modern Turkey, who said that “peace at home, peace in the world.” Relying on this proverb, the artist wishes to the entire world a “fair, happy and peaceful future.”

You can see more photos from the project below. Make sure to follow Uğur on Instagram and see more of his fantastic work.

Refugees await for dispensed food aids in 2016 March in Dadaab, Kenya.
By Marco Gualazzini
A Turkish gendarme carries the body of a migrant child on beach in Canakkale’s Bademli district on January 30, 2016. Least 33 migrants drowned when their boat sank in the Aegean Sea while trying to cross from Turkey to Greece.
By Halit Onur Sandal
Smoke rises from buildings following air strikes on the rebel-held besieged town of Arbin, in the eastern Ghouta region on the outskirts of the capital Damascus on January 8, 2018.
By Amer Almohibany
Smoke billows following a reported air strike by Syrian government forces in the rebel-held parts of the Jobar district, on the eastern outskirts of the Syrian capital Damascus, on August 9, 2017.
By Ammar Sulaiman
A street after clashes in Jobar, near the capital Damascus. 
By Ammar Suleiman
Iraqi detainee with bag over head, standing on box with wires attached.

Hundreds of Rohingya people crossing Bangladesh’s border as they flee from Buchidong at Myanmar after crossing the Naf River in Bangladesh, 10 September 2017.
By K.M. Asad
A refugee girl observes the sunset at Dibaga Refugee Camp in Iraq in August, 2016.
By Diego Ibarra Sanchez
Naked detainees with bags over their heads placed into a human pyramid as Spc. Sabrina Harman, middle, and Cpl. Charles Graner Jr., above, pose behind them in late 2003 at the Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad.
A hooded Iraqi detainee appears to be cuffed at the ankle and chained to a door handle while being made to balance on two boxes at the Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad.
June 26, 2015 .Salem Saoody, 30, is getting his daughter Layan (L) and his niece Shaymaa 5 (R) in the only remaining piece from their damaged house, which is the bathing tub. They now live in a caravan near the rubbles. By Wissam Nassar.

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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7 responses to “Turkish artist creates collages that send a powerful message to society”

  1. Evert Veldhuis Avatar
    Evert Veldhuis

    Strange to see (some) pictures which are not copyright free being put together with no mentioning of the original artists who took the pictures.

    1. stewart norton Avatar
      stewart norton

      Not crediting the original artist is standard pricproce these days ?

  2. Selim Alp Avatar
    Selim Alp

    Üzgünüm ama böyle saçma, basite kaçıp emek harcamadan yapılan şeyleri ancak benim vatandaşım yapıyor. üretmek adına hiçbirşey yapmayan sağdan solan çalıp birşeyler hazırlayan tek milletiz.

  3. Glorna Reis Avatar
    Glorna Reis

    Excellent and thought provoking. Copyright is an issue. Who *does* have the copyright on injustice, on warfare, on war-mongering and on rampant consumerism? Thank you Uğur

  4. A L Mendonca Avatar
    A L Mendonca

    Not truthful artist or not perceptive enough. Why does he not show Kuwait, Dubai or Bahraini sheikhs in traditional dress enjoying with their thoroughbred horses, harems, 7 star hotels, Over the top speed boats juxtaposed against war torn Syria, Yemen or Afghanistan or Rohingya refugees against Qatari Sheikhs on their Yachts.

    1. A L Mendonca Avatar
      A L Mendonca

      Adding to this : middle east should look within Yr own countries why your house is not in order.
      Agreed Africa is a different story.

  5. alexandre1 Avatar
    alexandre1

    Really thought-provoking and convincing. Because of course, there are no wealthy people in the Middle East or Africa or Asia, are there? All the rich are in the West, where they live meaningless, privileged lives. And there have never been wars or suffering in the West, have there? They have always had it easy, easy, easy. And all the wars that have happened outside the West are all enturey the fault of the West. In fact, before the West came, there were no wars, not anywhere.