TTArtisan 25mm T2.0 1.33x Anamorphic lens limited to only 200 units

Jul 31, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

TTArtisan 25mm T2.0 1.33x Anamorphic lens limited to only 200 units

Jul 31, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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TTArtisan has announced a new lens. It marks an interesting shift in direction for the company as it’s their first anamorphic lens. It’s a very compact-looking 25mm T2.0 with a 1.33x desqueeze factor and a 67mm filter thread.

It appears to perhaps be the first of a new “Anamorphot” range from TTArtisan, judging from the extra logo below the TTArtisan name at the top of the lens.

YouTube video

The lens was sent out to a handful of select YouTubers a little while ago when it launched in Japan. So, there aren’t too many secrets about the lens anymore, but this marks its global release.

TTArtisan 20mm T2.0 1.33x Anamorphic – Cool but not great

The review above does show quite an interesting lens, but you’re probably not going to be using this on high-end shoots. While the overall image quality doesn’t seem terrible, it has some pretty significant focus breathing.

There weren’t many out-of-focus shot examples in Damien’s review, or close-focus examples with bright blurry backgrounds. So, it doesn’t really reveal much about the shape of the bokeh and whether it has that classic oval anamorphic look.

Well, here’s another sample footage video that clearly shows some bokeh from light sources in out-of-focus backgrounds and… Well, they’re not as clean as one might hope.

YouTube video

For Fujifilm X and Sony E – and only 200 of them!

The TTArtisan Anamorphot 25mm T2.0 1.33x Anamorphic lens is an APS-C (or Super 35mm, if you prefer) lens designed for Fujifilm X and Sony E mount cameras. There’s no word on when or if the lens will be coming to other APS-C mounts, such as Nikon Z and Canon RF or if it’ll we’ll see an MFT version.

The lens is coming as a limited edition run of 200 lenses. I’m not entirely sure whether that’s 200 of each mount, or 200 lenses total. If the latter, there’s no suggestion that we’d see 100 of each mount or how the two will be divided up.

TTArtisan Anamorphot 25mm T2.0 1.33x Specs

Focal length25mm
FormatAPS-C/Super 35mm
Anamorphic1.33x
MountsFuji X, Sony E
Angle of viewUnspecified
T-StopT2-T16
Focus throw~120°
Min focus distance50cm
Aperture rotationUnknown
Filter diameter67mm
Dimensions72 x 65mm
Weight300g

Price and Availability

The TTArtisan Anamorphot 25mm T2.0 1.33x Anamorphic released in Japan at the beginning of July, where it had a price of ¥45,000. This equates to around $316. So far, it hasn’t shown up at any sellers outside of Japan. It’s expected to appear in TTArtisan’s Amazon store very soon. I think once it hits the USA, we can probably expect it to be around $350.

While this isn’t a high-end anamorphic lens by any stretch of the imagination, it doesn’t come with a high-end price tag, either. For around $350, I think it could be a fun lens for certain projects.

[via Fuji Rumors]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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