Tips for photographing children in the great outdoors

Jun 28, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Tips for photographing children in the great outdoors

Jun 28, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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I primarily photograph people, but children are a subject I’ve generally stayed well clear of. I have nothing against them, and apparently I used to be one (my wife says I still am), but when it comes to photographing them, it just really doesn’t appeal to me.

If you’re a parent, on the other hand, your children may be your most photographed subject, and something you actively enjoy. In this video, photographer Karl Taylor is going to give you some tips and tricks to help you get the best shots you can of your kids.

YouTube video

In this kind of a setting, it strikes me as being a little like photographing animals (you can read into that what you will), and the equipment and shooting technique is quite similar.

Being at distance using a long lens to separate the subject from the environment while still providing a sense of context is a great way to make them stand out and be the obvious focus of the images.

I’ve had long distance shoots like this with adults, where the assistant holding the reflector or light stand is helping to direct. I’d suggest picking up a couple of two-way radios if you’re planning on doing shoots like this regularly.

Not having to yell direction or instructions to your assistant definitely helps keep the mood of the shoot light, and is a lot easier on your throat.

Are you a photographer of children? What other tips and tricks can you offer to those who want to photograph their children? Let us know in the comments.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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