Three simple camera tricks that will surprise your viewers

Jan 23, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Three simple camera tricks that will surprise your viewers

Jan 23, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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While the long take is more famous in movies than in anything else, it’s become sort of a thing for vloggers, too. Often they’re walking, holding the camera while they talk and it can go on for several minutes. But it can be difficult to add creativity to these types of shots, especially when you’re filming on your own.

In this video, Peter McKinnon shows three camera tricks to help add some interest to your long shots talking to the camera, surprise your audience and leave them wondering how you pulled it off. The secret? You’re not filming on your own.

All three of the tricks shown in the video essentially involve handing off the camera to somebody else while making it appear as though you’re filming by yourself.

It’s a pretty cool technique that is quite common in movies, tv shows and televised events. Cameras are passed from one operator to another leaving the viewer with a continuous flow of seemingly impossible camera movements. Like, say, passing a camera from one operator inside a moving vehicle pulling to a stop through an open window to another operator outside, or vice versa.

They’re tricks you probably don’t want to overuse, as they can become quite obvious if you do. But they’re worth practising and keeping in your toolbox for when you think they suit the shot.

They’re also a great exercise in learning how to keep extra crew out of your shot when you’re shooting with a moving camera.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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One response to “Three simple camera tricks that will surprise your viewers”

  1. Philip La Lumiere Avatar
    Philip La Lumiere

    I’ll give you a hint: they could be LITERALLY ANYTHING ASIDE FROM GENERIC B ROLL AND WHIP PANS/ROLLS