Stop posting your vaccination card selfies on Instagram or face identity theft

Feb 8, 2021

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Stop posting your vaccination card selfies on Instagram or face identity theft

Feb 8, 2021

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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We’re all excited that we can finally get a COVID-19 vaccine. And when we’re excited about something, we tend to share it on social media. Well, before you post your vaccination card selfie on Instagram – think twice, and then don’t do it. Because if you do, you’re at risk of identity theft.

Federal Trade Commission warns you shouldn’t share your vaccination card photo on social media. In a recent blog post, they wrote:

“Your vaccination card has information on it including your full name, date of birth, where you got your vaccine, and the dates you got it. When you post it to Facebook, Instagram, or to some other social media platform, you may be handing valuable information over to someone who could use it for identity theft.”

And if you think, “oh, that’s not happening,” I have bad news: it is happening. In the UK, someone is selling fake covid vaccine cards for a mere £5. Some privacy experts warn that scam artists can also trick you into paying for the second dose of the vaccine and thus getting your credit card number, and I leave to your imagination what happens next. What a time to be alive!

So, if you really want to share something on Instagram, Federal Trade Commission suggests that you post a photo of an adhesive bandage on the injection site. “You can show off your tattoos and deltoids at the same time,” they add. Or even better, you can take a photo of your vaccine sticker. This way, you get your likes yet skip the risk of identity theft. The only consequence you might have is a ton of insults from anti-vaxxers, but that’s a whole new topic.

[via The Verge]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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One response to “Stop posting your vaccination card selfies on Instagram or face identity theft”

  1. Albin Avatar
    Albin

    My guess is some people aren’t just selfie-sharing but want to prove their vax for practical purposes. There’s going to have to be some kind of legitimate, official vax passporting for personal travel and venue admission as well as workplace normality. That will also be the stick to beat down the denial clowns. Governments are already way behind the curve on it, and lack of good ID will prolong the lockdowns.