This short video shows how one soft light can make a huge difference in final result

Jun 8, 2016

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

This short video shows how one soft light can make a huge difference in final result

Jun 8, 2016

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

diana-title

There is a lot of power you can master once you go from available light to even using one strobe. Photographer Manuel Ortiz demonstrates it in this short video where he compares two shots right out of camera (of course the photos can be later enhanced, but for the sake of this experiment, it is better to show them SOOC)

All photos are taken with the Sony A7RII and a Sony G master 85mm 1.4 lens which really gives great color and a wonderful bokeh, so the starting point is very similar.  The first shoo in all the demos below is set to available light. Note how Diana (the model) is correctly exposed in all of those, but the background is very distracting and it really takes away from the photo.

 

Then Manuel add a strobe in:  Flashpoint Xplor 600 TTL strobe, connected to a Godox X1T trigger which supports sync up to 1/8000 in a
Paul C buff 47inch Octabox. The high speed allows cutting the ambient exposure by two stops and the flash still makes sure that the model is correctly exposed. And this is all happening at F1.4.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ArYTUsW1U-E

Here is one example with one shot using available light (ISO 400, F1.4, 1/250) and the other one using a strobe and closing down 2.3 stops and using a TTLed strobe (ISO 400, F1.4, 1/1250 + )

Here is another example, going from available light (ISO 100, F1.4 @1/320) 2.6 stops down with a TTLed strobe (1/2000)

diana2-01
ISO 100, F1.4, 1/320
diana2-02
ISO 100, F1.4, 1/1000 + strobe on TTL
diana2-03
ISO 100, F1.4, 1/1600 + strobe on TTL
diana2-04
ISO 100, F1.4, 1/2000 + strobe on TTL

Lastly, here is how powerful this is when shooting against dusk skies (ISO 100, F1.4, 1/80 vs ISO 100, F1.4, 1/1250 + TTLed strobe)

Manuel Ortiz has a great youtube channel so check it out for more tutorials. You can also catch Manuel on his site, Instagram and Facebook page.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

24 responses to “This short video shows how one soft light can make a huge difference in final result”

  1. Wim van der Geest Avatar
    Wim van der Geest

    Like it! Thanks for sharing!

  2. Vincent Avatar
    Vincent

    The skin doesn’t seem to have the same exposure. The ones without the flash, seem to be lighter on the skin, so it’s difficult to compare the shots.

    1. Joseph Parry Avatar
      Joseph Parry

      It’s because the lighting is fired direct instead of feathered. It creates stronger contrast as opposed to softer lighting, the strong contrast makes the skin look darker (and perhaps it is slightly under exposed in comparison).

      1. Vincent Avatar
        Vincent

        I understand that, but still the overall/average exposure of the skin seems a lot lighter on the images without the flash.

  3. Mark de Cruz Avatar
    Mark de Cruz

    I’m a bit confused… Could someone please tell me how he can sync his flash and shoot at 1/1000. ? Is it something to do with the 2nd curtain sync flash???? Cheers

    1. Alin Tatu Avatar
      Alin Tatu

      I didnt have time to see the video, but from what i know, some speedlights have HSS wich is high speed sync. That means that a flash with hss can sync up to 1/8000.

    2. Vojislav Marković Avatar
      Vojislav Marković

      Some newer models of flashes support high-speed synchronization.For example I’m using YONGNUO YN600EX-RT and here is a part of its specs:

      “High Guide Number, Supports High-speed Sync
      GN60@ISO100,200mm;supports high-speed sync TTL, manual flash, Gr grouping flash, the highest synchronous speed can reach 1/8000s”

    3. Mark de Cruz Avatar
      Mark de Cruz

      Cheers. He’s using a studio flash rather than speed lights with a Sony AR2

    4. Joseph Parry Avatar
      Joseph Parry

      He’s using the Godox trigger and XPLOR flash stated above, both of which support HSS. Did you read the article?

      “Then Manuel add a strobe in: Flashpoint Xplor 600 TTL strobe, connected to a Godox X1T trigger which supports sync up to 1/8000 in a
      Paul C buff 47inch Octabox.”

    5. Francisco Joel Hernandez Avatar
      Francisco Joel Hernandez

      That studio flash has HSS. That’s what he’s using to achieve high sync speeds. =)

    6. Mark de Cruz Avatar
      Mark de Cruz

      great. Many thanks

    7. Max Faust Avatar
      Max Faust

      Why would you need that high speed? You can sync at 1/125 with a normal DSLR with a strobe and get the same result. You don´t really need a highspeed flash for that kind of portrait becasue you´re not freezing movements at all. Don´t confuse people.

      1. STRACHS Avatar
        STRACHS

        How would you darken the background, then? My take is that the faster shutter speed is for the purpose of letting in less ambient light without closing down the aperture. The flash is used to make the model brighter than the background, so that despite the short shutter speed (chosen for the above reason), she appears normally lit. Am I wrong?

    8. Jakub Merganc Avatar
      Jakub Merganc

      Max Faust nope you can’t get the same resul without hss or an ND filter. At 1/125 you would have to use a much higher f stop and lose the nice blurry bokeh. So don’t confuse people ;)

  4. Adel M. Takash Avatar
    Adel M. Takash

    Fayez Momani

  5. stewart norton Avatar
    stewart norton

    Has he used a gel ? , the model looks very warm.

  6. Stewart Norton Avatar
    Stewart Norton

    Did he use a gel ? The model looks warm in the flash shots.

  7. Roberto Miranda Avatar
    Roberto Miranda

    Por desgracia la foto sigue siendo igual de mala con la luz que le pongan. Tal vez otro ejemplo donde se note algún beneficio.

    1. Steven Avatar
      Steven

      Si gusta puedes ilustrarnos con un ejemplo tuyo.

  8. Walter Geddes Avatar
    Walter Geddes

    Nice work and such a beautiful model.

  9. Iamderricklogan Avatar
    Iamderricklogan

    nice work

  10. Fonzie Vitela Avatar
    Fonzie Vitela

    Natalee Vitela

  11. DAWRIS DESING Avatar
    DAWRIS DESING

    OMG

  12. TTaz Avatar
    TTaz

    I want that Godox trigger & Flashpoint combo. Nice.