Manfrotto quietly launches Pro Light Cineloader bags for filmmakers

Aug 6, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Manfrotto quietly launches Pro Light Cineloader bags for filmmakers

Aug 6, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Manfrotto has quietly released a new bag range. Called the Manfrotto Pro Light Cineloader, it’s designed for professional videographers, filmmakers and crew. The bags actually started popping up at retailers last month to absolutely no fanfare whatsoever.

Manfrotto says that the bags are designed for freelance videographers who need to carry “a whole studio in a bag”, journalists that need to grab a bag and run to the next story, and small video production needs.

YouTube video

Manfrotto Pro Light Cineloader

The Manfrotto Pro Light Cineloader is available in three sizes of small, medium and large. Each is designed, obviously, for different gear carrying needs. If you’re shooting a small mirrorless rig, you might not need a huge bag. But if you’re shooting something like a Sony FX6 (buy here) or URSA Mini (buy here), you’re going to need a bit more space.

Cineloader SmallCineloader MediumCineloader Large
Capacity12L25L39L
Ext. Dimensions42x25x24cm54x31x28.5cm60x35x36cm
Int. Dimensions35x19x18cm49x25x21cm55x29x25cm
Payload Capacity10kg15kg25kg

All the bags feature reinforced side walls and a thermoformed protective lid that allows bags to be stacked. Underneath this lid are zip pockets, allowing you to store small items such as memory cards, lens filters, gaffer tape, etc. that you need access to often or in a hurry.

Not just for cameras!

Manfrotto is also targeting the bags towards drone pilots and audio engineers, suggesting that the bag would ideally suit either of them. I have to admit, I’m tempted by the small one to replace my existing portable audio bag.

I mean, hypothetically, you could use it to do your shopping. It’s a bag. But the design features that benefit cameras, also benefit drone pilots and engineers who also have expensive and delicate equipment to transport.

Side note: Been a long time since I’ve seen an XDCAM logo on active marketing photos!

M-Guard Dividers

Internally, the Cineloader bags are split using Manfrotto’s M-Guard divider system. Manfrotto says they offer the “ultimate protection for professional gear”. The M-Guard system is now offered with all of the company’s new bags, including their camera backpacks.

It’s made of high density EVA foam with “unique folding patterns” that Manfrotto says “allow maximum versatility to fully protect your camera gear, while maximising use of space”. Basically, they’re thinner and stiffer than the old foam dividers while offering more protection.

Price and Availability

The Manfrotto Pro Light Cineloader is available in three sizes. Small is available to buy now for $219.99, Medium is available to buy now for $279.99, and Large is available to buy now for $319.99.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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