Is losing your camera the worst end to a trip ever?

Jun 9, 2018

JP Danko

JP Danko is a commercial photographer based in Toronto, Canada. JP can change a lens mid-rappel, swap a memory card while treading water, or use a camel as a light stand. To see more of his work please visit his studio website blurMEDIAphotography, or follow him on Twitter, 500px, Google Plus or YouTube. JP’s photography is available for licensing at Stocksy United.

Is losing your camera the worst end to a trip ever?

Jun 9, 2018

JP Danko

JP Danko is a commercial photographer based in Toronto, Canada. JP can change a lens mid-rappel, swap a memory card while treading water, or use a camel as a light stand. To see more of his work please visit his studio website blurMEDIAphotography, or follow him on Twitter, 500px, Google Plus or YouTube. JP’s photography is available for licensing at Stocksy United.

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Is Losing your camera the worst end to a trip ever

My family and I recently returned from a week-long early spring backcountry camping trip.

This trip involved canoeing in snow squalls and an extended portage where the lake was still frozen solid. Physically, it was a challenge, but it was also an amazing family bonding experience with my wife and our 9 and 12-year-old kids (the golden years when they are useful humans but not yet teenagers).

At the end of the trip I sat my trusty old Fuji X100 (the original model) on a post in the parking lot to snap one final family portrait in self-timer mode.

Then we drove home…

Is Losing your camera the worst end to a trip ever

I think you know where this is going.

Of course, I didn’t just have one camera. I also had my Nikon D800 as my primary stills camera and a Sony a6300 for video. The Fuji X100 is mostly used by the kids now, but I still use it for family snapshots on the go.

Plus it’s just a damn sexy looking camera, and it’s been around the world with us.

So the next day (after a 5-hour drive home) we’re unpacking the car and as I’m uploading the memory cards from my other cameras I realized…

Me: Hey…has anyone seen the Fuji?

Wife: No.

Daughter: Nope.

Son: What’s a Fuji? The silver camera. Oh…no.

Wife: Well, it’s got to be here somewhere – when was the last time that you remember having it?

Me: Hiking out I was using it…I don’t remember putting it in the car….it’s not in the camera bag…

Wife: Gasp!!! Did you leave it sitting on the post in the parking lot after we took our family photo!? (In self timer mode.)

Me: Awwwwww ffffffuuu#k.

Is Losing your camera the worst end to a trip ever

At this point, I am picturing my little Fuji X100 sitting on top of a wooden post, in a parking lot in the middle of nowhere, a 5-hour drive away.

It wasn’t the only camera we took with us, and I didn’t lose all the photos from the trip – but I did lose a fair chunk of the more family oriented snapshots that we captured.

Plus I just really like that camera!

Is Losing your camera the worst end to a trip everIs Losing your camera the worst end to a trip everIs Losing your camera the worst end to a trip ever

Now, this was very early spring – nobody would be using the access point we were parked at for another few weeks. If I left the camera sitting on a post in the parking lot, there was a very strong chance that it would still be there.

The whole day I couldn’t shake it – I was so upset about losing this camera and all the photos on the memory card that I started rationalizing a ten hour round trip to go pick it up.

I checked the forecast – heavy rain this evening – the memory card would survive, but the camera would probably be toast.

I started re-arranging my work schedule – if I left now, I could make it through the city before rush hour and probably get there before it started raining.

If it was still there…but where else could it be? In my mind’s eye, I could see exactly where I left it – sitting on top of a wooden post, facing the lake.

So I thought – that’s it – I’m going – if I leave right now I’ll be back by midnight – it’s only 914 kilometers – I’ve got an audiobook on the go and 10 hours of driving is nothing.

So I picked up my phone to text my wife and let her know that I would be a little late for dinner – and I saw a text from her…

Wife: Check the glove compartment! I think I might have put it in there because I didn’t want it to get banged around loose in the car.

And yes, that is exactly where I found it!

Is Losing your camera the worst end to a trip everIs Losing your camera the worst end to a trip everIs Losing your camera the worst end to a trip everIs Losing your camera the worst end to a trip everIs Losing your camera the worst end to a trip ever

Have You Ever Lost A Camera – Or A Memory Card?

I was surprised at how upset I was about losing a camera and more importantly, all the photos on the memory card.

I know that in the grand scheme of things, it’s not a big deal – but at the time I really felt terrible about it!

Have you ever lost a camera or a memory card?

Were you able to get it back?

What lengths did you go through to recover it?

How did you feel when you realized that your camera was missing?

Leave a comment below and share your story!

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JP Danko

JP Danko

JP Danko is a commercial photographer based in Toronto, Canada. JP can change a lens mid-rappel, swap a memory card while treading water, or use a camel as a light stand. To see more of his work please visit his studio website blurMEDIAphotography, or follow him on Twitter, 500px, Google Plus or YouTube. JP’s photography is available for licensing at Stocksy United.

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5 responses to “Is losing your camera the worst end to a trip ever?”

  1. Gionni Avatar
    Gionni

    Make up a card with your name and address. Then, every time you format a memory card, photograph your name and address card. Also add a text file to the memory card with the same information. If someone finds the camera they will probably look at the photos, and the one of your address card will be first. If you are lucky they will be honest and call you to return the camera.

    1. JP Danko Avatar
      JP Danko

      That is a great idea!

    2. Rick Avatar
      Rick

      And add an email address if you travel internationally. You can generally get to your email anywhere and it is far more appealing than the cost of having to dial an international number for the person who finds your stuff.

  2. W Douglas LeBlanc Avatar
    W Douglas LeBlanc

    The name and address on the SDcard is a good idea, but also its best to format the card inside the camera and not the computer. So maybe a tag outside on the camera or something.

  3. eunaovoumeadaptar Avatar
    eunaovoumeadaptar

    What a story!
    Last week I returned from a trip to Fernando de Noronha Island, in the middle of nowhere in the Atlantic Ocean, miles from the Brazilian mainland.
    I just took my compact Canon G16 camera to make the 5 day registration there. The camera with WiFi was the best choice because everyday at the end of the day, I saved the images on my phone and posted on some social network, just that. On the penultimate day I was doing some pictures, I unbalanced and the camera fell into the sea, I jumped into the sea I took the camera that was soaking wet but the camera instantly erased and the memory card was intact (they always survive by incredible it seems ). I came home upset, I was able to recover the images until the day of the accident.