Fuji Shows the Best Argument Ever For Mirrorless Over DSLR

Jan 16, 2016

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

Fuji Shows the Best Argument Ever For Mirrorless Over DSLR

Jan 16, 2016

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

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The debate over which system is better, DSLR or mirrorless, is on its way to becoming as heated as Canon vs Nikon.

As mirrorless systems improve and catch up to DSLR cameras, or in some aspects outdo them, the decision which to get isn’t as easy as it used to be.

One of the main advantages of mirrorless cameras is that they are much lighter, and that’s exactly the point Fuji’s vice president demonstrated today – in the most awesome argument made to date.

Fujifilm’s senior vice president Toru Takahashi spoke at a press event earlier today, following the company’s announcement of the long-awaited flagship X-Pro2 and several other cameras, and made a strong argument in favor of the new cameras.

While obviously humorous, a slide in his presentations showed that a DSLR weighs two 500ml cans of beers more than its mirrorless counterpart.

It’s not that saying the camera is 1 kg or 2 lbs lighter doesn’t sound significant, but comparing it to everyday items probably drives the message home better. Sure, he could have compared the weight difference in photographic equipment, but this was a brilliant comparison from a marketing point of view – the proof is that you’re reading about it right now.

Anyway, the weight saved by using a mirrorless camera can almost be “exchanged” for that of Fuji’s largest telephoto lens – the 100-400mm. Weighing it at 1.375 kg the lens will make the DSLR almost a beer can lighter, but there’s not much you can do with a camera and no lens, is there?

The slide was made public by a representative from Wex Photographic who attended the event and found it worthy of a tweet:

[via Mirrorless Rumors]

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Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

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15 responses to “Fuji Shows the Best Argument Ever For Mirrorless Over DSLR”

  1. Ruben Lyteheart Avatar
    Ruben Lyteheart

    ehh, I don’t worry much about weight for the nature of my shoots.

  2. Vlad Moldovean Avatar
    Vlad Moldovean

    Just that most pros dont drink on set:))

  3. Gerry Calub Avatar
    Gerry Calub

    I love my mirrorless camera – I can make calls on it too! Note 5

  4. Gustavo Muniz Avatar
    Gustavo Muniz

    It doesn’t matter which is lighter, if a dslr weights more but delivers higher quality, then I always will choose a dslr.

  5.  Avatar
    Anonymous

    Until they put a handle on the body that allows me to hold a 1.2kg lens, it really doesn’t matter whether it’s lighter – all that does is screw up the balance even more.

    Or do a 70-200mm f/2.8 FF lens that doesn’t weight 1.2kg. Ergonomics matter more than just weight.

  6. James Fogg Avatar
    James Fogg

    I have both (Nikon D3 and others, Panasonic Lumix G5). I’ve used adapted high quality primes on the G5 and the native MFT lenses. I’ve spent time with the G5 to learn it well. It sits in my equipment case and doesn’t get touched. I know the G5 isn’t in the same class as the D3, but I just can’t get comfortable with an electronic viewfinder. The preview screen is far more accurate in rendering color and lighting, but I’m a 45 year photographer and I find preview screens to be a huge bother, time waster and taking the camera away from my face to look at the screen changes the shot. I’ll deal with the weight and expense of my DSLR’s. I’ll even take a good rangefinder or TLR over a MILC. The one thing it is very good for is making movies. For that kind of work I spend most of my time with the preview screen anyways, and the ability to adapt almost any lens ever made to the G5 has it’s advantages. I’m using all my lenses from all kinds of manufacturers that I’ve collected over the years.

  7. Christopher R Field Avatar
    Christopher R Field

    People are so uptight these days…

  8. David Magee Avatar
    David Magee

    I think it all depends on the situation. You don’t use a hammer on screws and you don’t use a screw driver on nails. I own a DSLR and would not traid it when working in a studio. Yes it weighs a ton but it is also nicely balanced. I own a Leica M8 that I adore. I love the slower pacing and it’s viewfinder. It’s great with good light but a nightmare in darker situations. And I own a Fuji x100. And amazing camera that I always have on me. It’s light, small, and is good with bad light. But it has mayor design issues and focus problems. I love all of them and they all have unique selling points and draw backs. The one thing I myself will never use are electronic viewfinders. It feels like I’m removed from the scene and that to me is something I,m not giving up.

  9. Mason Unrau Avatar
    Mason Unrau

    Chuck & Rafik I thought you should see this haha

    1. Rafik Mehemmedyarov Avatar
      Rafik Mehemmedyarov

      Ha ha

  10. vincent-b Avatar
    vincent-b

    It is still a question of feeling. The feel with optical viewfinder. Take the best mirorless camera, the viewfinder has a different feel, and a slight delay. You can poruce the exact same quality work with now change in your workflow. It’s only about the feel. For the time being I’m ok carrying extra weight: I love the feel. I have a special focusing screen for fine manual focus, and that’s immensely nice to look at. I feel like it’s a camera, not a video camera.

    I’ll get to mirorless, that’s not even a question. When I’ll invest in a new body, chances are it will be ML. I’ll miss the feeling and the mirror flipping sound and vibration… that’s a bit silly I know :)

    As for Fuji’s communication, I find it little demonstrative to adress this in terms of weight. For high end cams you’ll use high end glass anyway, it weights, and it’s not a bad thing to have a good weight balance between the body and the glass, along a good grip on the body, when you hand hold it. And that’s not gimmicky, that’s quite important. They could talk about vibrations, fast focus, “get-what-you-see” and stuff like this.

  11. Mahmood Redha Avatar
    Mahmood Redha

    I don’t know how this can be considered!
    we cannot compare a small Fuji with a big DSLR like D4 or 5D, but for an enthusiast DSLR like the D7100, it will weight 100 or 150 grams more only when it compared with 24MP Fuji bundled with a good lens, and I know that my mobile phone weights more

  12. Eric Dye Avatar
    Eric Dye

    Does it have to be versus? One or the other? We have point and shoots, rangefinders, DSLRs, Mirrorless, Smartphones, and don’t forget film of all sizes! I don’t see why there needs to be a debate about what is better.

  13. Dan Platon Avatar
    Dan Platon

    For me is a question of feeling, the position when take the photo, the noise of the mirror, etc.

  14. tom rose Avatar
    tom rose

    The Internet is full of marketing hype promoting Mirrorless. The technique is to make photographers dissatisfied with their DSLR outfits. In reality there is not a huge difference in technology between the DSLR and MSCs as modern DSLRs with live view can be used in Mirrorless mode. So the only thing to be pushed is the weight saving from doing away with the mirror and pentaprism altogether. Consequently a big fuss is made about the weight of professional DSLRs, as if carrying an extra kg was as hard as carrying a 25kg backpack.

    It is understandable. The manufacturers have to sell cameras and it is a problem when even 10 year-old gear is more than good enough for what most photographers do. I also expect that the profit margins have potential to be bigger with mirrorless.

    Removing knobs and buttons and putting controls on a touch screen saves even more money, but for those of us that photograph for hours on freezing cold days that makes such cameras far from ideal.

    Ergonomically, for the time being, and for normal sized men, the professional DSLR still has advantages. And when we want to travel light there are plenty of choices: tiny DSLRs, compact P&S, rangefinder, and a variety of so-called MSCs. When we want the ultimate in performance and versatility the “dinosaurs” still have it.

    Perhaps EVFs will eventually deliver an image with no perceptible lag, and the option of flipping between the scene as it appears in reality, and as it will be recorded by the sensor. Then there will be no question that a vibration-inducing mirror and heavy pentaprism are indeed obsolete and can be dispensed with. But we are not there yet.

    Even then I would still want a camera that is big enough to suit my hands and with knobs and buttons that I can work with gloved hands rather than a touch screen.