DIYP Interviews Flow Motion Master Rob Whitworth

Nov 17, 2015

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

DIYP Interviews Flow Motion Master Rob Whitworth

Nov 17, 2015

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

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Rob Whitworth’s latest flow motion video was released a few days ago and judging by the fact that it’s been viewed over 1.5 million times already, I think it’s fair to say that his unique style still captivates audiences.

Curious to find out more about the kind of production efforts involved in such a project and some behind-the-scenes information, we caught Rob for a few questions.

Read on to find out what gear was used, how long it took to create the project, and how this video compares to previous projects.

DIYP: How long did it take to shoot and edit the video?

RW: 6 Weeks ­ a couple of those were spent waiting for the weather to improve and about the same working in post production. I spent 295 hours working on location (including recon and shooting) and another 278 hours in post production.

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DIYP: I bet that’s a lot more time than most people would imagine goes into a video less than two and a half minutes long. Other than you, how many people were involved in creating the video?

RW: We had quite a team on this one (thanks everyone). In addition to myself and my production manager, Sue Long, we used the services of Gavin Thurston and kit from Moving Picture Hire to achieve the more cinematic shots involving Jibs and Dolly and the like.

Local talent Baybers and Seda helped out with the modelling in the majority of scenes, as well as a few other extras.

Kıvanç Kaçakgil was our on location liaison with Turkish Airlines and also organised access to locations.

Slava Pogorelsky helped bring the soundscape to life which was quite a job with lots of competing ingredients.

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DIYP: Did this project present any unusual challenges or difficulties?

RW: Every video presents new challenges, it’s always about doing something new-bigger and better.

Having said that one of the key challenges with this video was sadly familiar… the weather.

There was a random long period of grey overcast days right in the middle of shooting. Luckily it cleared up and we got all of the shooting down but not after a few reshoots and far too much time looking up to the heavens.

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DIYP: Other than the moments of sunshine, what did you particularly enjoy about this shoot?

RW: A perk of shooting the videos is getting to really spend time in a location. Absolutely loved my time in Istanbul, a truly delightful city, so rich in heritage and beauty. Very much hope I get to work / visit again.

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DIYP: After creating several of these flow motion videos, do you find it gets easier to do or is it just as challenging each time?

RW: I’m sure it would do if I kept making the same video.  It’s crucial to keep trying new things and keep upping your game, becoming more ambitious.

I do find every project takes me through the full spectrum of emotions; moments of despair, moments of jubilation et cetera.

Nobody would be interested in watching the same video again and again in different locations, least of all myself. It’s all about innovating and trying new things.

In a typical storyboard there are elements that I can only guess how I’m going to realise them. It’s pretty fun to have  everything agreed with the client… and then you sit down and think…. right how am I actually going to shoot this.

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DIYP: Your videos use several techniques, including time lapse, hyperlapse, flow motion and video recording. Is there a specific technique you enjoy using most?

RW: It’s not specifically about one technique, rather blending multiple techniques transitions together to create a seamless entity. Well that’s the plan anyway.

I really enjoy working with models to help bring scenes alive. Not so much a technique but a growing element in my work.

I have come at this from a photography background so many of the film making aspects are all new to me and an area I find exciting.

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DIYP: Back to your latest video, ‘Istanbul’, how many still photos were taken in the process of creating it?

RW: 71k Raw files, 3.8TB of data in total.

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DIYP: What gear was used for this video?

RW: The video was primarily shot with

Cameras:

Nikon D7200 x 2

Nikon D810 x 2

Samsung NX1

Sony F55

 

Lenses:

 

Accessories:

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DIYP: Any plans for the future you’re able to share with us?

RW: Nothing fixed as yet, however hopefully this won’t be my last video. :-)

More About Rob

Visit Rob’s website for more of his awesome work and follow him on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for updates. You might also want to subscribe to his YouTube or Vimeo channels.

 

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Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels

Liron Samuels is a wildlife and commercial photographer based in Israel. When he isn’t waking up at 4am to take photos of nature, he stays awake until 4am taking photos of the night skies or time lapses. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Facebook.

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2 responses to “DIYP Interviews Flow Motion Master Rob Whitworth”

  1. Alex Avatar
    Alex

    Does anyone know what the green tape is for?

    1. dude Avatar
      dude

      So focus, zoom, etc don’t get bumped.