CC’s “No Rights Reserved” Mark Looks Dangerously Similar To Behance’s “All Rights Reserved” Mark

Oct 2, 2015

Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller is a photographer and content strategist based in Hawi, Hawaii. Her work has been shared by top publications like The New York Times, Adobe, and others.

CC’s “No Rights Reserved” Mark Looks Dangerously Similar To Behance’s “All Rights Reserved” Mark

Oct 2, 2015

Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller is a photographer and content strategist based in Hawi, Hawaii. Her work has been shared by top publications like The New York Times, Adobe, and others.

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The two marks, shown here with text, look virtually identical to each other when used alone.
The two marks, shown here with text, look virtually identical to each other when used alone.

Jim Wehtje discovered an apparent oversight that could potentially cause a lot of headaches for photographers and creators in general). It appears the symbol Adobe’s Behance website uses to mark a specific work’s copyright as “No use is allowed without explicit permission from owner” is the exact same mark the Creative Commons uses to label a work as “No rights reserved“, which puts into the public domain. Obviously two very different licenses. Yikes!

The symbol as Behance uses it:

behance

The symbol as the Creative Commons uses it:

CCpD

As PetaPixel reported, it’s can be hard to tell who used the symbol first. Behance dates back to 2006, and the development of the Creative Commons license began very shortly after in 2007. Either way, it’s probably just an oversight. Adobe will most likely change the symbol to prevent confusion (or at least we hope). However, in the meantime, you may want to take a mental note and double check the language attached to those symbols!

[ via PetaPixel ]

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Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller

Tiffany Mueller is a photographer and content strategist based in Hawi, Hawaii. Her work has been shared by top publications like The New York Times, Adobe, and others.

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2 responses to “CC’s “No Rights Reserved” Mark Looks Dangerously Similar To Behance’s “All Rights Reserved” Mark”

  1. photo Avatar
    photo

    Slight error here. You have it that CC is ‘no use at all’. If it was no use at all it would not be in the public domian.

    1. Tiffany Mueller Avatar
      Tiffany Mueller

      You’re right, that was typo! I corrected it to read “No Rights Reserved”. Thanks!