Canon has a new 19-megapixel global shutter full-frame CMOS sensor to be released in 2023

Dec 16, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Canon has a new 19-megapixel global shutter full-frame CMOS sensor to be released in 2023

Dec 16, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Canon has announced that they’ve developed a 19-megapixel global shutter full-frame CMOS sensor. There are four different models of the same LI5030S sensor in colour, black and white, colour/near-infrared and full spectrum, all capable of shooting full resolution at up to 58 frames per second. Canon says that the new sensor will be ready to go on sale in January 2023.

But don’t get too getting too excited just yet. It looks like we probably won’t be seeing this come in an EOS R mirrorless camera. At least, not anytime soon. At the moment, it appears that this sensor is targeted more towards scientific and industrial use, rather than photographic. Use cases where being able to see full unwarped and undistorted images shot in rapid succession is often mission-critical.

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Its 19-megapixel resolution of 5,688 x 3,334 makes it about 2.3 times that of 4K, providing for greater detail for industrial monitoring applications. It allows a camera to shoot a perfect representation of scenes in front of them in an instant as if they were static scenes and without the rolling shutter effect typical of CMOS sensors. Canon says it has a high sensitivity, thanks to its relatively large 6.4μm pixels, and that the company’s own-developed noise suppression technology also helps it to have a wide dynamic range for high contrast operating environments.

With more global shutter sensors appearing for industrial and scientific use over the last couple of years, hopefully, it won’t be too much longer before we see them in the kinds of cameras we use to shoot photos and video. I mean, it’s not like photographers haven’t been asking for global shutter sensors since Nikon stopped using global shutter CCD sensors (I still have my D200 and still love to drag it out occasionally). And filmmakers and video guys have been moaning about rolling shutter since day one – and often still do.

This sensor, though, probably won’t be it. We’re likely still at least a couple of generations away from being able to use these in our daily lives. To find out more about this sensor and the current state of Canon’s global CMOS shutter technology, see the Canon Japan website.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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6 responses to “Canon has a new 19-megapixel global shutter full-frame CMOS sensor to be released in 2023”

  1. unheardvoice Avatar
    unheardvoice

    “…Nikon stopped using global shutter CCD sensors” I’m pretty sure Nikon is still using them (or at least soon will need to if they haven’t yet 😛) in their fancy new volumetric stage. 4D just won’t work with a rolling shutter.

    1. Kaouthia Avatar
      Kaouthia

      Nikon switched to CMOS sensors years ago.

      1. unheardvoice Avatar
        unheardvoice

        Nikon’s Create studio, which opened up earlier this year, (as far as I can find) does not disclose what type of sensors they’re using for volumetric capture. That being said, you cannot successfully produce 4D video with a rolling shutter sensor; you won’t be able to align the data from each camera accurately enough for MRCS to build an accurate mesh. From their highlight reels, it’s hard to tell what kind of sensors are being used, but the cameras are clearly volumetric cams, not any of their consumer models. I’m not disputing whether it’s CCD or CMOS, I’m saying it would be a really costly gaff on the company’s part if they haven’t set up the studio with global shutters. And given the output from Nikon Creates that we’ve seen so far, it seems like they did it right.

        1. Kaouthia Avatar
          Kaouthia

          And is this in their current DSLR/Mirrorless lineup? I’m not saying they’re not experimenting still with CCD sensors for certain applications but they’re not in their DSLRs or mirrorless cameras. The implication was pretty obvious.

          1. unheardvoice Avatar
            unheardvoice

            ¯⁠⁠_⁠(⁠ツ⁠)⁠_⁠/⁠¯ not for now anyway, as far as I can tell. Is it obvious? An optical element manufacturing company that sells everything from microscopes to point-and-shoots being discussed in an article about the potential for this tech being used in independent-owner consumer tech. Not to mention volumetric capture is a rapidly growing industry, with startups and even single-person parties using everything from Reds to Kinects on their rigs, and very few companies that build cameras specifically for it. That line between commercial and industrial is thinner each week, and it wouldn’t be unfathomable for Nikon to try to capitalise on or merge its two markets.

            You mention in your post that “We’re likely still at least a couple of generations away from being able to use these in our daily lives.” But don’t really explain why. What makes you think so?

          2. Kaouthia Avatar
            Kaouthia

            Why do I think we’re at least a couple of generations away?

            Because it’s destined for industrial use. This is a PHOTOGRAPHY site, for PHOTOGRAPHERS. That’s why the implication is obvious. Are you sure you know where you are?