Watch: This is how you behave when a giant moose approaches you while taking photos

Mar 14, 2024

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Watch: This is how you behave when a giant moose approaches you while taking photos

Mar 14, 2024

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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Wildlife photographers sometimes encounter wild animals up close and personal. While it sometimes ends badly, other times, people react properly and just enjoy the encounter from a safe distance. Wyoming photographer R Zaccardo recently shared a video of a large moose approaching a group of photographers. While it may seem scary at first, the video is a great example of how to behave when a wild animal gets close to you.

“I am probably 50 yards away from the moose,” the photographer explains in the caption. “All of the other photographers were also 50-100 yards away to start, and the moose decided to walk in our direction.”

Are moose dangerous?

Moose are normally not aggressive towards people. However, if the animal is stressed, a bull moose in the fall rut or a cow moose protecting her young could attack you, according to Alberta, Canada’s official website. Emergency Essentials shares seven signs that indicate an attack by a moose:

  1. The moose stops eating and stares at you.
  2. Lays back its ears and raises the hair on its hump, neck, or hips.
  3. Smacks or licks its lips, and clicks its teeth.
  4. Lowers its head and walks toward you.
  5. Urinates.
  6. Shows the whites of its eyes.
  7. Whips its head back like a horse.

“But sometimes it may not even show these signs at all,” this source warns, “they may just charge without warning!”

I’d say these folks reacted well – they stepped aside, kept their distance, and let the moose pass. They didn’t provoke it or try to feed or pet it. Most of them found a safe spot near their vehicles. And from what I can see, they have telephoto lenses, so they were taking photos from a safe distance to begin with.

“Everyone was incredibly respectful of [the moose’s] space and stayed relatively in place in order to not spook him.” Zaccardo points out. As Wyoming residents, we always respect the wildlife.”

[via Whiskeyriff]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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2 responses to “Watch: This is how you behave when a giant moose approaches you while taking photos”

  1. Deer Hunter Avatar
    Deer Hunter

    I’ll never want to meet people who think it is a sane idea to “provoke, feed or pet” an animal weighing 600+kgs. With antlers the size of two arms’ length. These are probably also the folks putting their heads between the jars of an alligator because they think, it just yawned. Geeze. Brains anyone?

  2. John Beatty Avatar
    John Beatty

    White stationed in NH, I would take photo hikes whenever I could. The White Mountains were one of my favorites. One day I did a short hike off the Kancamagus looking for shots of the sun coming through the trees I heard something behind me. I turned and there was my first sighting of bull moose. I’m 6’3″, this guy made me look…and feel 3 inches. We were on the same trial, about 20 feet apart. My camera was in my backpack. I slowly moved off the trail into the bush and kept looking at him knowing there was no way I could get my camera out. He looked at me, mosied (or would that be moosied) along the trail passing me with a look my way like saying, “What’s up!) I gave him a head nod and he went on his way. I was sweating, pissed I didn’t have my camera out, and zipping with excitement. I did not see another moose until 30 years later
    we did a family trip in 2022 to Yellowstone and saw a bull and two cows across a river along the parkway.