“View Image” button is now removed from Google Image Search

Feb 16, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

“View Image” button is now removed from Google Image Search

Feb 16, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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A few days ago, Getty and Google announced the upcoming changes as a result of a licensing deal. The announced changes have arrived, and now you can’t see the “View Image” button on Google any longer. Instead, if you want to see the photo, you’ll have to go directly to the website where it’s hosted.

Perhaps you remember the dispute between Google and Getty, which is what eventually brought to these changes. Previously, the users were able to view the photo and download the hi-res version directly from Google. This led to “the detriment of the 200,000 contributors” of Getty, as their General Counsel stated when the whole dispute began.

Maybe you also remember that dude who got sued for copyright infringement? He thought the photos found through Google Image Search were free to use, and the photographer got him sued for $27,000. Probably because of the people like this, Google has also made the “Images may be subject to copyright” notice more visible.

Other than “View Image,” Google has also removed the “Search by Image” button. They note, however, that reverse image search still works. So, you can still check if someone has stolen your photos.

Google confirms that these changes “came about in part due to [their] settlement with Getty Images this week.” They should make a balance “between serving user needs and publisher concerns.” The company emphasizes that the changes are good for everyone: users, web publishers and copyright holders.

Some users argue that you can still view the photo without visiting the website. All you need to do is right-click on the image and then click “Open image in new tab.” However, you won’t get a hi-res version of the image.

To which extent this will affect the copyright holders, we have yet to see. Those who know how to steal a high-res photo will still do it, I suppose. However, as DL Cade of DPReview notices, this feature could at least save those “accidental pirates” from themselves, and save photographers from their accidental theft.

[via DPReview]

 

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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4 responses to ““View Image” button is now removed from Google Image Search”

  1. Anthony Kerstens Avatar
    Anthony Kerstens

    No big deal. If you’re using firefox you can still right-click on the image, select “view image” and firefox will take you to the high res image anyway. Shhhhhh. don’t tell Getty.

    1. Elisa Avatar
      Elisa

      And there is even a method to save images on websites where right click is disabled. Shhh!

  2. Andrea Avatar
    Andrea

    This is NOT good for the users. Most of the images that I download using the now removed option I like to save to view at my own convenience, funny stuff for example etc. Certainly not to use it somewhere commercially. And I hate that a lot of times, when you visit the site, the picture is nowhere to be found, or it says the page cannot be accessed etc. Also, it forces you to use more data when you are using mobile/limited internet. As you said. whoever wants to use other people’s pictures without attributing to the author or outside of the copyright limits, can still do it and will do it.