We have only taken six photos on Venus. Here they are

Mar 8, 2023

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

We have only taken six photos on Venus. Here they are

Mar 8, 2023

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

photos venus surface collage

Although our celestial neighbor seems to be convenient for exploration, there are only a handful of photos ever taken on Venus’s surface. Its world is hostile, with scorching heat and harsh pressure which destroy almost any lander that touches it.

However, four spacecraft survived to tell the story of Venus and successfully returned to Earth. It was way back in the 1870s and 1890s, and these landers have been the only ones to take photos of Venus up close and personal. In this article, we bring you these photos, along with some fun facts about Venus that you may not have known.

[Related reading: NASA shares first-ever visible light images of Venus’s surface]

It was in 1975 and 1982 that four of the Soviet Union’s Venera probes took photos of Venus’ surface. NASA got relatively close last year, but not as close as Veneras. The landers scanned the surface back and forth and created panoramic images of their surroundings. “They revealed yellow skies and cracked, desolate landscapes that were both alien and familiar,” The Planetary Society writes. “Views of a world that may have once been like Earth before experiencing catastrophic climate change.”

photos venus surface close
Credits: Russian Academy of Sciences / Ted Stryk

The man behind the panoramas of Venus’s surface is Ted Stryk. He is a philosophy professor at Roane State Community College in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and specializes in reconstructing images from early space missions. He used data from the Russian Academy of Sciences and reconstructed the best-possible versions of the original Venera panoramas. Here are the rest of the images:

photos venus surface rover
Credits: Russian Academy of Sciences / Ted Stryk
photos venus surface lander
Credits: Russian Academy of Sciences / Ted Stryk
photos venus surface yellow soil
Credits: Russian Academy of Sciences / Ted Stryk
photos venus surface black and white
Credits: Russian Academy of Sciences / Ted Stryk
photos venus surface rocks
Credits: Russian Academy of Sciences / Ted Stryk

Fun facts

First, let me tell you a quick fact about the name of the probes. Venera stands for “Venus” in Russian, as well as in my native language, Serbian.

And now, here’s another fact I’ve never thought of before, yet it makes sense and it blew my mind. Did you know that Venus isn’t the closest planet to Earth? More than half of the time, it’s actually Mercury! I was today years old when I find this out, and here’s an animation that explains it better than I would.

YouTube video

Finally, I also find it incredible that these are the only Venus surface photos ever taken in nearly 40 years. And they’re quite enough to make my imagination run wild and think about what this would have looked like before… And what we might discover if someday scientists make a lender that will withstand Venus’s hostile environment.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

3 responses to “We have only taken six photos on Venus. Here they are”

  1. trialex Avatar
    trialex

    However, four spacecraft survived to tell the story of Venus and successfully returned to Earth. It was way back in the 1870s and 1890s, and these landers have been the only ones to take photos of Venus up close and personal.

    Wow, Victorian era spacecraft! to think the Wright brothers didn’t even invent the airplane for more than 30 years after we’d landed spacecraft on another planet! :-)

    Also I think it’s only data that was returned to Earth, the landers are still there.

  2. Alvin Xant Avatar
    Alvin Xant

    “However, four spacecraft survived to tell the story of Venus and successfully returned to Earth. It was way back in the 1870s and 1890s, and these landers have been the only ones to take photos of Venus up close and personal. ” …. 1870 and 1890s, hahaha, victorian steampunk spacecraft with pedals or what?

  3. Adrian J Nyaoi Avatar
    Adrian J Nyaoi

    Only six photos? What are they using, a large format film camera.