These guys tested every video stabilizer so you don’t have to (but you probably still should)

Aug 4, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

These guys tested every video stabilizer so you don’t have to (but you probably still should)

Aug 4, 2022

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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If you shoot video, you know that you’re going to need some kind of stabilisation at some point in the process. Whether it’s a tripod, gimbal, a whole giant rig or simply relying on the camera or lenses built-in stabilisation, there are so many different ways out there. We can even stabilise in post, thanks to things like Adobe’s Warp Stabiliser and DaVinci Resolve’s gyro-stabilisation for Pocket cameras, or Sony’s similar tech.

Picking which one to choose for a given situation can be challenging, especially if you don’t have a lot of experience using all of the different methods out there. So, the team from Syrp Lab decided to give them all a try to see which worked best in which situations, from gimbals and IBIS to software stabilisation like that found in GoPros as well as the aforementioned Warp Stabiliser.

YouTube video

It’s a fascinating video that doesn’t just put them to the test against each other but also goes pretty in-depth into exactly how things like gimbals, IBIS and electronic image stabilisation techniques actually work. They pull back the curtain on the magic to explain the fundamental principles of how they all do what they do and the advantages of each – as well as their inherent potential problems.

As with most things in the camera world, there’s no one solution that’s best for everybody. Nor for every situation. So, you may sometimes have to choose a different stabilisation method depending on the circumstances of the shot you’re trying to get. Regardless of which stabilisation methods you may currently use – and despite the title of the video – it’s worth getting out there and pushing them to their limits to figure out exactly what their capabilities are for your own needs.

How do you keep your camera steady?

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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