The SpeediGimbal monopod head gets you ready to shoot action in an instant

Sep 5, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

The SpeediGimbal monopod head gets you ready to shoot action in an instant

Sep 5, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Love them or hate them, massive lenses are just a requirement for certain types of photography. Sports, wildlife and other forms of action when you’re shooting from a distance all need them. Their size makes them a pain, though.

Even with a monopod, they can be quite difficult to shift around on location, especially if you need to act quickly. Colin Brister, though, has developed a solution. It’s called the SpeediGimbal (buy here) and you can stick it on the monopod you already own.

So we are ready to go…. Here is the SpeediGimbal.Perfect if you photograph wildlife, sport or even need support while using scopes. Available at my website, P&P inc..https://colinbrister.co.uk/product/speedigimbal/Please Share…

Posted by Colin Brister on Monday, September 4, 2023

Colin’s video does a great job of showing how it works and what it does – with a dash of dad humour thrown in for good measure. Essentially, it’s like a ball head, except, it’s instantly detachable and instantly uhh… attachable.

A monopod head in 2 parts

It’s a two-part system. One is a ball that attaches to the top of your monopod. The other is a collar that mounts beneath your camera or the tripod collar of your lens. Both of these are made from nylon, so you don’t have to be as delicate as you would were it machined from aluminium or another metal.

As well as providing some cushioning when you plop your rig on top of your monopod, it should also minimise any wear while using it – another issue with metal-on-metal.

Not to be left unattended

It’s not the ideal head for unattended shooting. You can’t put this thing on a tripod and leave it there, firing with a remote shutter. Gravity will kick in and you’ll lose your camera and lens. But if you often find yourself moving around a location a lot and need to be able to respond quickly to what’s going on in front of you, it’s a great-looking solution.

The speed Colin demonstrates in the video, switching between stances and removing and replacing the camera on top of the monopod is very effective. You could potentially achieve a similar range of motion with a regular ball head, however, it would be much more difficult to disconnect the two when you need to move quickly.

This is why many wildlife and sports shooters just leave their monopod attached and locked all the time when wandering. Of course, this usually results in a 4-5ft pole sticking out behind you, whacking people in the legs as you walk by.

Not with SpeediGimbal, though. Here, you just lift it off, camera in one hand, monopod in the other, and leg it to the next spot. When you’re ready to shoot again, just pop it back on top and you’re ready to go in an instant.

Price and Availability

The SpeediGimbal monopod head is available to buy now for £65 (about $82) from Colin’s website.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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One response to “The SpeediGimbal monopod head gets you ready to shoot action in an instant”

  1. Mike Shwarts Avatar
    Mike Shwarts

    “You could potentially achieve a similar range of motion with a regular ball head, however, it would be much more difficult to disconnect the two when you need to move quickly.”

    True, but it doesn’t have to be terribly difficult. I use a Slik ballhead on a monopod. The Slik comes with a quick release plate. Not as easy to use as this device, but beats screwing and unscrewing the monopod to lens collar.