The case against the watermark

Aug 21, 2018

Michael Reynolds

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

The case against the watermark

Aug 21, 2018

Michael Reynolds

We love it when our readers get in touch with us to share their stories. This article was contributed to DIYP by a member of our community. If you would like to contribute an article, please contact us here.

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Inevitably a time comes around in when a budding photographer decides to start “taking this seriously”, “discouraging image theft”, and my personal favorite, “gaining exposure”. And they do this of course, with a watermark.

Now mind you before I get to the nitty-gritty of why this is Bullock’s, I’ll cover the surface level problem with this. First, 9/10 watermarks made by a beginner look horrendous. Too big, too small, too opaque, too transparent, or gaudy. Not to mention most beginners haven’t settled into a legitimate business name by the time they start watermarking images. So ten years later they can look back at their Facebook images with that wonderful, neon pink, floral designed “elegant memorable captures Dixie memory precious flowers” and recall with pride, their humble beginnings.

Moving past the obvious, let’s assume the photographer has set into this business of photography with a sound mind and has all the ducks in a row, a well-vetted name on which to build a brand (which is arguably entirely another topic.)

Now, this photographer is traipsing around local photography circles, showing off images either for praise or critique, with some plastered logo and mark across the image, unconcerned with the implied notion behind the mark.

Are the other photographers potential clients?

Are we who you’re marketing your brand too?

Are we thieves looking to steal your work?

Will we take you more seriously because you put some text onto the image in Photoshop and dropped the opacity?
The answer typically to these questions is no.

No, we aren’t your clients or target market.
We don’t want your work (we take pride in our own art)
And, rather than take you seriously we may take you less seriously after seeing the flaw, or worse yet, we may dig harder into your work seeing how confident you are in your legitimacy.(Think of that what you may.)
The misled thinking primarily behind the beginner’s watermark is that somehow the watermark legitimizes the photographer and their work. That somehow clients along with other fellow photographers will take you more seriously because of a watermark. Not by the quality of your work, the time you’ve invested, the extensive marketing and grinding you’ve done for self-promotion, nope, a watermark is the path to legitimacy.

This couldn’t be further from the truth.

Small hint: Clients don’t care about your watermark unless it’s obstructing their ability to gauge if they like your work or not. -counterproductive.

Bigger hint: Photographers who’ve been around awhile will spot the error from a mile away and perhaps have even less likelihood of respecting you based on the idea you’re projecting. Which is that titles, not hard work, are what makes a photographer.

If you’re doing work for a steal that’s going to gain a lot of exposure (REAL exposure) watermark away.

If you’re sending images for a client to mull over before purchasing, sure place a watermark.

Don’t be fooled however, watermarks don’t deter theft. The larger the watermark perhaps makes it harder to remove, but keep in mind that the displeasing effect it will have on potential viewers counteracts any potential benefit.

If you want a real “watermark”: develop a brand, a personalized style that when anyone sees a picture you’ve taken it’s unmistakable who took that image.

Because after all, that’s the true sign of a photographer digging their heels in and doing the work.

About the Author

Michael Reynolds is a part of Lucky Sparrows wedding photography duo, based in Farmville, Virginia. Other than wedding photography, they also specialize in photographing portraits and events. You can check out more of their work on their website and follow them on Instagram and Facebook. This article was also published here and shared with permission.

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3 responses to “The case against the watermark”

  1. Michael Groah Avatar
    Michael Groah

    Yeah I dunno, I do WM my images cause when I didn’t someone else took credit and got work that I might have gotten because of it. So yeah, I WM my images if post it for showing to others. But things are different in the wedding duo photography world too.

  2. Karen Hirsch Avatar
    Karen Hirsch

    A case for the watermark: 1. If an infringer removes a watermark and uses your photo, it shows intent to hide the true author of the photo, which is evidence of the offense. 2. Google snatches up images from the internet. If the photographer’s name is not visible on the image, it is not easy to find out who is the originator and it is more tempting to use the photo. Have you heard of orphan works? I suggest having a small watermark with the copyright symbol at the lower right of the picture.

  3. Mike Avatar
    Mike

    Uh… seriously?

    I go after any copyright violations hard and removing a watermark makes it that much easier to prove intent. Metadata is stripped away by most platforms and the only way anyone can find you is via watermark.

    Piece is written by a true artist who believes in that “pure” image gaining them being noticed and getting hired but the wedding biz is way different than what many others do.

    After 47 years I know that the only thing that matters is getting prospective clients to call because something interested them. If a watermark puts them off, so be it. The people wanting to hire you certainly want to develop and protect their brand or intellectual property.