The Camera Canopy is a plastic “roof” that stops your camera & lens from getting wet in the rain

Feb 8, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

The Camera Canopy is a plastic “roof” that stops your camera & lens from getting wet in the rain

Feb 8, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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This is another one of those photography products that’s either really dumb or absolute genius. I haven’t quite decided yet. Most photographers who shoot outdoors will have to deal with the rain at some point. Personally, I defend against it by using weather sealed gear. But that’s not an option for every photographer.

Devised by a small team in Brooklyn, the Camera Canopy is another way around that problem. It’s essentially an acrylic roof that attaches to your hotshoe and goes over your camera and lens, protecting it from the rain falling down from above. Seems logical, right?

Sure, there are other options out there, like various rain coats, which are anything from a glorified plastic bag to a fairly nice thick padded enclosure with windows. But I’ve used those, and boy do your hands and arms sweat when they’re inside those things, which just introduces humidity into the air inside the bag, which then fogs up the viewing window. And they can make it fiddly to adjust your settings, too.

The Camera Canopy gets around this by not actually encasing your whole camera and lens. It sits above it like, as the name suggests, a canopy. So, you get full freedom of movement using your camera and lens as you normally would.

It’s a pretty unique design, but a couple of things stick out to me…

  1. That thing’s fairly long, and it weights about 2lbs. It mounts to the hotshoe, and it can extend.
  2. It’s going to be pretty useless in windy conditions, as there’s no protection from rain coming in from the side

Even the hefty Nikon SB-900 speedlight only weighed about 12oz. This thing weighs more than double that, and the weight is extending out way beyond that which normally sits on a camera’s hotshoe. And this thing can extend to cover really long lenses. This means it’s going to magnify that weight and force on the hotshoe. It’s simple physics.

In windy conditions, as well as offering little protection from the sides, that thing’s going to be a hell of a wind trap, creating even more force on the hotshoe than just the weight of the thing alone.

That doesn’t mean that it’s necessarily a useless product. Hotshoes are pretty strong things these days. 99 times out of 100, if you’ve got a flash on there and something breaks, it’ll be the flash’s foot before the camera’s hotshoe. But, it would be nice to see some kind of attachment near the front of the canopy so that you can rest it on the top of your lens to take some of that load and strain off the hotshoe – in the same way that a tripod collar on a long lens stops you from having to put all that front-heavy weight on the camera’s 1/4-20 socket.

But, it does mean it’s probably only going to be useful in light rain or calm conditions with little-to-no wind.

Personally, I think I’ll just stick to using weather sealed gear. I do like the general idea, though. And I think some will find it quite useful. Possibly Sony shooters.

If you want to find out more, see a video of it in use, or even buy one of your own, they’re $79.99 over on the Camera Canopy website.

[via Digital Camera World]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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19 responses to “The Camera Canopy is a plastic “roof” that stops your camera & lens from getting wet in the rain”

  1. Justin Barr Avatar
    Justin Barr

    Most of the Sony camera line is weather-sealed, chuckleheads.

    1. Daniel Fernandez Avatar
      Daniel Fernandez

      But still failed a few tests with more than a sprinkling of water, compared to Nikon, Canon, and Olympus. ?

  2. Mario Dennis Avatar
    Mario Dennis

    Weather sealing won’t keep the front element dry. This might.

    1. John Aldred Avatar
      John Aldred

      You didn’t think those lens hoods that come in the box with lenses were really for “protection” against damage, did you? ;)

  3. Rosella Gmünder Vitto Avatar
    Rosella Gmünder Vitto

    My Pentax love rain….

    1. Pierrick Urvoy Avatar
      Pierrick Urvoy

      mine too, Pentax is good for you

  4. Stefan Avatar
    Stefan

    Funny you´re saying that Sony user might be interested. The video is showing a Nikon :)

  5. Jean Murphy Avatar
    Jean Murphy

    Only if it’s not windy lol

  6. john myers Avatar
    john myers

    And you have to drag that big bulky monstrosity around with the rest of your gear? I’d rather poke a couple holes in the carry bag it comes with and use it instead!

  7. Pierrick Urvoy Avatar
    Pierrick Urvoy

    i try this, ugly but efficient

  8. Matthias Avatar
    Matthias

    It attaches to the Hotshoe… oh boy. No way!. Why on eartjh didn’t they make the attachment to the tripod attacment?

  9. gly Avatar
    gly

    So are you supposed to hold the camera in that horizontal position for the entire time it rains? That might make hiking a little more challenging.

  10. Jesse Watson Avatar
    Jesse Watson

    Your Headline is golden!

  11. pincherio Avatar
    pincherio

    I wouldn’t be caught dead shooting with something that stupid. I’ve been out shooting in light showers with a Rebel and a kit lens and it held up just fine. Anything stronger and that contraption wouldn’t offer much protection to your camera. If you really have to shoot out in the rain, go jerry rig an umbrella to your body so you can protect your head and body as well

  12. Lennart van Wezep Avatar
    Lennart van Wezep

    * Laughs in Pentaxiaans *

  13. Deacon Avatar
    Deacon

    I can’t believe you actually wasted time writing about this stupid gimmick :D

    1. Kaouthia Avatar
      Kaouthia

      I can’t believe you commented on it. Thanks! ;)

      1. Deacon Avatar
        Deacon

        My pleasure ;)

  14. Michael J Focus Avatar
    Michael J Focus

    The camera canopy is now available for sale at Focus Camera!!!!!!!!!