IRIX launches new range of Edge “MMS” magnetic ND, CPL and UV cine lens filters

Nov 25, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Nov 25, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

IRIX has launched its new range of Edge Magnetic Mount System (MMS) filters for use with IRIX Cine lenses. They’re available as either UV, CPL circular polarizer or neutral density in various strengths from 2-6 stops of reduction.

They’re designed to click right into the magnetic mount on the end of IRIX cine lenses to which you normally attach your lens hood. But they’re also stackable, meaning you can attach your hood right onto the end of them.

YouTube video

The magnetic filter hood on the IRIX cine lenses is… well, it’s an odd one. No other company really does it. It’s a great idea, in theory, but in the real world, it seems like it’s not all that great and regularly fall off, even when just removing it from your bag. For filters, however, it’s a little bit different. They’re not as easy to knock, and they’re not as front-heavy as a lens hood, so they’re probably less likely to fall off. But, it is something to bear in mind, especially if you’re planning to stack the hood on top of filters. You don’t want your hood taking a knock, falling to the ground, and taking your filter with it.

Fortunately, there are other options to deal with flare besides lens hoods… Like, matte boxes. These do the same job (only arguably better), and can be mounted directly to the lens itself or to a rail system, depending on your rig – a matte box would also prevent accidentally knocking the filter itself.

But the benefits of magnetic filters, especially neutral density when working in ever-changing lighting conditions can be extremely valuable and save a lot of time on set. And it’s nice that IRIX lenses have the magnetic ring built into them. It’s unfortunate, however, that there doesn’t seem to be any rings to allow you to add a magnetic ring to a regular screw-on thread on your non-IRIX lenses. So, you’re pretty much only using these with your IRIX glass. If you’re mixing cameras and lenses, you’ll have to get different filters for your other one – which is going to be a colour correction headache.

I don’t know. It’s a cool idea, and there are plenty of other magnetic filter systems out there which prove that it’s a great concept. For example, Manfrotto’s Xume system converts any of your round screw-on filters into magnetic ones. Many landscape and long exposure photographers love them.

But for video? I think if I’m going to be using a matte box anyway, I’d sooner just use 4×5.65″ filters. That way I can use them with any lens I own.

The IRIX Edge MMS filters are available in UV, CPL and various strengths of ND from November 27th, with prices ranging from €85-109. You can find out more on the IRIX website.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *