Here are all of the popular Godox portable strobes compared for size

Oct 4, 2018

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Here are all of the popular Godox portable strobes compared for size

Oct 4, 2018

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

Since posting my AD400 Pro review a few days ago, I’ve had a lot of people asking me how it compares to other lights. Most notably the AD200 and a pair of AD200s with the AD-B2 head. They want to know how the power, recycle times and other features compare, but they also want to know how the size compares for storage and travel.

I have a second AD200 and the AD-B2 head on the way to me now so I can test how the power and features compare. But in the meantime, my friend Mark Ratcliffe has been able to shoot a size comparison for me of his Pixapro (the main UK Godox distributor) branded versions. And he’s allowed us to post the images on DIYP for you guys.

The main one that everybody’s been asking about is the dual AD200 and AD-B2 setup. If they’re only ever going to use them in this configuration and not as a pair of separate 200Ws lights, will the AD400 Pro fit in its place, and how does the size compare on top of a stand?

Well, bear in mind that the AD400 Pro (CITI400 Pro) doesn’t have the Bowens adapter fitted here. But here it is from front, rear and side angles against a pair of AD200 (PIKA200) units with the dual head.

As you can see, the AD400 Pro is very similar in size to the overall package of a pair of AD200s with the AD-B2 dual head. The body on the 400Pro is a little narrower, but also taller. When it comes to the length, it’s actually a little shorter. But it does have that handle sticking out of the bottom, too.

As to which is absolutely smaller, well, you can break apart the AD200s and the AD-B2 dual head to fit into some small gaps in your bag. You can’t exactly do that with the AD400 Pro. So, which is going to be a better fit is going to depend on you and which bags you’re using to store them.

Mark also passed along a quick comparison of the AD400 Pro to the AD600 Pro (CITI600 Pro) and AD600BM (CITI600).

As I said, bear in mind the AD400 Pro isn’t sporting the Bowens adapter, and the AD600 Pro doesn’t have the handle attached underneath – and boy does that handle make a difference to usability, especially on location.

I also posted a couple of images at the end of my review of the Godox AD400 Pro showing how it compares in size to a single AD200 without the thicknes of the AD-B2 head. So, I might as well post those again here, too. Note that in these images, the AD400 Pro does have the Bowens mount adapter attached.

Hopefully, these give you some idea of how each of the lights stands up against each other when it comes to the physical size of the unit. and whether your next purchase might actually fit in your bags.

Once my second AD200 and AD-B2 head arrives, I’ll be doing some full comparisons of power and features between all of the Godox strobe units.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

7 responses to “Here are all of the popular Godox portable strobes compared for size”

  1. Frank Herzmann Avatar
    Frank Herzmann

    my Godox AD 600 Pro has a handle attached

  2. Roy Bridgewood Avatar
    Roy Bridgewood

    Hey a massive thank you for this. It has helped me make a choice

    1. Kaouthia Avatar
      Kaouthia

      No problem, Roy. Glad it helps. :)

  3. rifki syahputra Avatar
    rifki syahputra

    finally
    this is really helpful
    Thanks a lot John

    1. Kaouthia Avatar
      Kaouthia

      No problem, Rifki :)

  4. José Soriano Avatar
    José Soriano

    I like the ad400, shame that is only TTL, I don’t need that

  5. Frank Nazario Avatar
    Frank Nazario

    so the curve of diminishing return strikes again… you have to pay a pretty penny for 2/3 of a stop more of light… something that can be taken care of very easily in post… yeah i think santa will bring me 2 AD400’s this xmas…. or who knows maybe 4 or 6 speedlights instead of a AD600