DIYP reviews Samsung’s 1 terabyte T3 SSD

May 22, 2016

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

DIYP reviews Samsung’s 1 terabyte T3 SSD

May 22, 2016

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

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The folks over at Samsung were kind enough to send us a 1 Terabyte  SSD drive for review (yes you read that right, 1 terabyte). We’ve been using it for a while and we are thrilled.

Basically, I found nothing negative to say, aside maybe the fact that it is not padded. On the other hand, we are going to wait with a full fleet conversion for a while, and only for one reason. Or actually 799 reasons :)

Pros:

1. It is uber fast, especially on the write side. we got to speed as high as 150GB/second which is roughly a gig every every seven seconds. This is fast. On the read side we managed to pull 400 MB/second on medium files and about 100MB/second after a while on big transfers

2. It’s small. How small? maybe half a smart phone, or 5-6 credits cards stacked together, and about 50 grams on the weight side. This is less than your average chocolate bar. If you travel with a bunch of drives, you will definitely fill the reduction of side and weight.

samsung-t3-ssd-03

3. USB type 3 – reversible FTW!

4. Samsung claims the T3 are shock resistant, they did not provide any spec as to how shock resistant they are, but considering the low weight and the absence of moving parts, I tend to trust them.

5. It’s huge. We tested the 1 TB version, but for the same size, you can get a 2 TB version. Now, if you have a 2 TB SSD even internally raise your hand. yea, its huge.

Cons

We are going to wait though on a full fleet conversion, and only due to price. We now own 6 2TB Transcend drives, a full move would be around $5,000 and while we love the drives, we are going to wait for a price drop. It is the same with every technology, and as big SSDs will become more popular, the price will drop. We will be there for the take.

Samsung T3 SSD: 500GB ($179): Amazon | B&H, 1TB ($367): Amazon | B&H, 2TB ($799): Amazon | B&H

Here are the full specs:

samsung-t3-ssd-02

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Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

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4 responses to “DIYP reviews Samsung’s 1 terabyte T3 SSD”

  1. LensLord Avatar
    LensLord

    I would surely love to see ten of the two Terabyte SSDs stacked into a hot swappable raid. :-)

  2. Raphael Bruckner Avatar
    Raphael Bruckner

    Way too much money

  3. OlayTerry Avatar
    OlayTerry

    Would be nice to have one of these, but the price is prohibitive.

  4. Daris Fox Avatar
    Daris Fox

    Note that OS X has some issues handling UASP to get the full potential out of this drive, you ideally need a USB 3 port on your machine as pass-through doesn’t always work especially over Thunderbolt. OS X has supported UASP since 10.8.

    When you check the device properties it will be flagged as a USB SCSI device, it’s anything else then you’re not getting full throughput rendering the point of having this drive moot and instead getting a cheaper option.

    Most modern PCs with Windows 8 onwards can handle it natively, though there can be issues with cheaper mobo’s. With Windows 7 the situation is more complicated as you’ll need to ensure all drivers are there and they communicate properly with each other at a hardware level.

    Final note: UASP is backwards compatible to USB 2 but that’s mostly to queuing commands rather than throughput you need USB 3 host controller to make the best usage of it’s potential.