How to create frozen ice effects in Photoshop

Dec 29, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

How to create frozen ice effects in Photoshop

Dec 29, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Christmas may have come and gone, but winter is only just setting in. And with Winter comes the frosty photos and similarly chilled subjects. In this video from Photoshop wizard Nemanja Sekulic, we see a way to give any object a frozen look. Fantastic for those winter themed superhero shots.

YouTube video

It is quite an involved process, and the video’s nearly 19 minutes long, but it’s very effective. Much of that time is taken up by accurately selecting around the objects you wish to freeze. The rest is largely straightforward and you could probably put much of it into an action. The short version, though…

  • Cut out your objects and duplicate them onto a new layer
  • Desaturate them and apply a Plastic Wrap filter to the layer
  • Invert the layer and set it to screen blending mode
  • Add a clipped Hue/Saturation layer above and turn it blue
  • Duplicate the hand layer and apply a frosted glass filter filter
  • Soften the edges of the object where it meets other objects
  • Add a glow and some frozen debris flying through the air
  • Run it through ACR and Nik Effects filters to taste

And then you’re basically finished. Of course, it’s a lot easier said than done. It’s quite a stylised look, but it’s pretty effective, and it can work on just about anything.

 

I can’t imagine it would be too difficult to translate this method over to something like After Effects for use with video.

So, what will you freeze?

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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4 responses to “How to create frozen ice effects in Photoshop”

  1. Douglas Smith Avatar
    Douglas Smith

    What about unfrozen ice effects? ;)

  2. Dan Root Avatar
    Dan Root

    Very cool and well produced ??

  3. FROSTY Avatar
    FROSTY

    Not bad, but I hate when people add “Blue’ “Green” to ice! Is the ice in your fridge blue and green? No.. ice only has those other colors when it’s reflecting off something else, or in some parts of the world “Gas” gets trapped in the ice, and shows a tint of color. ICE is white, clear, and FROSTY!

    1. Paul Adams Avatar
      Paul Adams

      Ice, like water, is blue.