Canon’s new G9 X Mark II 8.2fps RAW burst mode, dual lens and sensor stabilisation

Jan 5, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Jan 5, 2017

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Canon have updated their popular G9X compact camera with a couple of new additions. While it remains largely unchanged from its Mark I predecessor, it does feature a couple of pretty significant changes. The two biggest two being the massive speed increase from a 1fps Raw “burst” to 8.2fps as well as a new dual IS system utilising both the sensor and lens.

Although compact cameras seem to be slowly dying off due to the advancements of cameras in smartphones, it isn’t stopping some companies. Some people just prefer the versatility of a zoom lens and better ergonomics. The G9X Mark II is also the first Canon PowerShot to feature Bluetooth as well as Wi-Fi and NFC, as well as improved AF tracking.

Like its predecessor, it features a 20.2MP sensor and 28-80mm equivalent f/2-4.9 lens. It has no viewfinder, but it does have the 3.0″ touchscreen LCD found in the Mark I.

The new Dual Sensing Image Stabilization combines both lens and sensor IS systems to provide up to 3.5 stops of shake reduction. It’s quite a little powerhouse for a compact, although I don’t imagine it’ll cause many Mark I owners to want to upgrade unless they really need the burst speed.

For those looking at picking up a compact camera to slip in their pocket instead of having to lug big DSLR or mirrorless setups around, it could be perfect.

If you’re looking at something a little beefier, perhaps for vlogging, Canon have also announced a new G7X Mark II Video Creator Kit, which adds a Manfrotto Pixie tripod, spare battery, and 32GB SanDisk Ultra SD card.

The G9X Mark II is available available for pre-order now in black or silver for $529.99. Shipping is expected to begin in February.

The G7X Mark II Video Creator Kit is available for pre-order now for $749.99, and is also expected to start shipping in February.

Have you been thinking about adding a compact to your kit for those times when you want to pack light? Are you considering the G7X II or G9X II? Have you got the original G9X? Is the improved stabilisation and Raw burst enough for you to upgrade? Will you stick with what you’ve got? Or go for something more capable? Let us know in the comments.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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One response to “Canon’s new G9 X Mark II 8.2fps RAW burst mode, dual lens and sensor stabilisation”

  1. Michael Lombardi Avatar
    Michael Lombardi

    If they can put 3 stops of IS in a P&S, are they going to start incorporating respectable IS in their SLRs instead of relying on it in individual lenses?