Build your own DIY field monitor for shooting with DSLRs

Jul 28, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Build your own DIY field monitor for shooting with DSLRs

Jul 28, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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diy_field_monitor

Whether you’re shooting video or stills, field monitors can be invaluable. For video the advantages are obvious. Nailing focus is a lot easier on a big screen. That works for stills, though, too. Field monitors get very expensive, very quickly, though.

In this two part video series, YouTuber GreatScott, takes us step by step through the creation of a DIY field monitor. It also doubles up as a great monitor for Raspberry Pi, or to extend your regular computer desktop.

Part 1 walks us through the components. It explains how everything works together to get a video signal from your camera to the screen.

YouTube video

The components list isn’t that long, and you may already have some of them sitting in a box somewhere.

In the second video the case is built. Cases are a very personal choice. So, you may choose to go with something a little different. Perhaps you’d like to 3D print one?

YouTube video

The cost works out to be around $122, plus the case and a small tripod to mount it on. Of course, electronics components often require you buy in packs of 5 or 50 or 500. You may already have some of these components laying around, or you may find them individually for less if you hunt around.

diy_lcd_monitor

If I look around the components I have available right now, I’m only missing the screen, cell charger and cells. So, this brings the cost for me to around $80.

There’s only really one small changes I’d make, if I were building this.

The first is the tripod connector. MDF isn’t exactly the strongest of materials. I think cutting that much material out for a tripod plate to sit inside would make it too week. If yo go with a wooden case, I’d look at a more secure option.

I got lucky and picked up a huge bag pronged 1/4-20 tee nuts for very little cost a while ago. These only require you to drill a hole. Individually, they’re not expensive, but you usually have to buy in packs of at least 100.

diy_hdmi_monitor

I would also advise being very careful if you choose to go with a different LCD. I bought a Waveshare 7″ HDMI Touch Screen LCD a few months ago for a Raspberry Pi project. For that it works beautifully, and it also extends the Windows desktop very nicely.

For a DSLR, it doesn’t work quite so well. Actually, it doesn’t work at all, really, as it only runs in 1024×600 resolution. It simply can’t handle or convert standard HD resolutions. All you see on the screen is a garbled mess.

There are other alternatives out there, like actual field monitors. Alternatively, you could use a tablet like the Nexus 7 running qDslrDashboard over USB or WiFi. But for those who like to tinker, this is a great weekend project.

If you need more detailed instructions than the videos provide, you can check out the full documentation over on Instructables.

Have you thought about building your own field monitor? Have you actually done it? How did you do it? Or did you just pony up and get a proper field monitor? Let us know in the comments.

[via Instructables]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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7 responses to “Build your own DIY field monitor for shooting with DSLRs”

  1. Leroy Franssen Avatar
    Leroy Franssen

    Joey Franssen

  2. Renato Murakami Avatar
    Renato Murakami

    Interesting project. I ended up caving in and buying a 7″ car display fully assembled with 1080p HDMI input which I’m not quite sure will work (it’ll take a while to get here), but I also have a Raspberry Pi and an Arduino coming up, so it’ll end up used somehow.
    My PC repair station also needs a small screen, so there’s that too… xD So many parallel projects.

    If it doesn’t, I might have to come back for this post. xD

    About the casing, I’d try to make it as light as possible… perhaps a sheet of aluminium would be better? Also thinking of another project involving LEDs… as I’m pretty new to DIY stuff, not sure if I should be dealing with certain types of materials, but it might be worth a try. Plastic container with plenty of holes for breathing? I have a feeling this hobby will lead me to dumpster diving… :P

  3. GraciaRyan0102 Avatar
    GraciaRyan0102

    Its a good project to build your own field monitor. But its components cost is very high. So, tell me chip components that would be less costly.

  4. Tom trophy Avatar
    Tom trophy

    Great diy, but I am using the DSLR controller app to send real time image and control my canon cameras remotely.

  5. Manvendra Singh Avatar
    Manvendra Singh

    Thanks for This! https://bestofmonitor.com