BBC admits they faked some scenes in Human Planet documentary

Apr 6, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

BBC admits they faked some scenes in Human Planet documentary

Apr 6, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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In a recent statement, the BBC admitted that one of their documentary series isn’t entirely documentary after all. Some of the scenes from their 2011 series Human Planet were admittedly staged by the creators.

In an episode about the Korowai people of Papua New Guinea, the tribe members were filmed while moving into a treehouse. However, while shooting a new documentary series, the members of the tribe admitted that “they built the treehouses for the benefit of overseas programme makers.”

YouTube video

The truth was reportedly revealed just recently, during the filming of My Year With The Tribe, a new documentary series for BBC2. As The Guardian reports, the BBC said in a statement that they “have been alerted to a breach of editorial standards” in the aforementioned episode of Human Planet. They reportedly reviewed the sequence in Human Planet and found that “the portrayal of the tribe moving into the treehouse as a real home is not accurate.”

According to The Guardian, this isn’t the first time that the scenes in the BBC’s documentary were faked. In 2015, the BBC admitted that they used a semi-domesticated wolf instead of filming a wild one. In an episode about Venezuela jungle from 2011, they had admittedly shot a tarantula spider in a studio.

The BBC is known for their groundbreaking and high-end documentaries. However, after scandals like this, one can’t help but wonder how much of it is real. The BBC told in the statement that they have “strengthened [their] mandatory training for all staff in editorial guidelines, standards and values” since Human Planet was first broadcasted. But, it seems that the makers still don’t respect these guidelines, standards, and values at all times.

[via Gizmodo, The Guardian]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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3 responses to “BBC admits they faked some scenes in Human Planet documentary”

  1. Ahmet Avatar
    Ahmet

    Actually BBC really wanted to film the traditional way of life. The problem is that it does not exist anymore. So the locals created a village for them. The film crew did not order it. Maybe they wanted to beleive it was real. :) I actually know someone who was there. :)

  2. Jerome Courtois Avatar
    Jerome Courtois

    Here’s the shocker: no documentary is truly neutral nor real.

    1. Ahmet Avatar
      Ahmet

      Well, here a complete village moved out to the forest, built a traditional village, undressed and sang local pop songs (as folk songs) in front of the camera. There was a demand for tribal culture on the market and they served it.