Zion National Park bans tripods for photography workshops

Jan 16, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

Zion National Park bans tripods for photography workshops

Jan 16, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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Zion National Pak has introduced updated rules for photographers and their faithful companions – tripods. From now on, if you are shooting as a part of a photography workshop, you won’t be allowed to use a tripod on any trail within the park.

As FStoppers writes, in the previous years, groups of photographers were allowed to use tripods on some of the National Park’s trails. But starting in 2018, tripods are banned from all trails. According to FStoppers, you will only be able to use them on paved parking areas and pullouts. However, you will be able to use monopods, according to the Zion National Park’s regulations.

It’s worth noting that the ban is only applicable to photography workshops. These tours must not interfere with other visitors and block the trails. If you are shooting alone, you’re good to go. Remember, though, that you will still need a permit if you want to shoot commercially.

You can see more on these updated rules and regulations on this link. It’s useful to keep these rules in mind if you are running or attending a photography workshop at Zion National Park.

[via FStoppers; lead image: Doug Dolde (altered)]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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7 responses to “Zion National Park bans tripods for photography workshops”

  1. Mark Niebauer Avatar
    Mark Niebauer

    Such Hippocrates! They destroy the landscape by adding roads and letting mass people come in to collect their money then ban their activities. How stupid these Park people are! They don’t even have jurisdiction to do so. It’s only their opinion . ..

    1. TByte Avatar
      TByte

      I doubt Hippocrates even knew what a camera was. He died 2,400 years ago.

    2. Fred Smith Avatar
      Fred Smith

      The photo classes are hogging the roads and the photography sites for regular visitors, so the ban is justified. What do you know about “juristiction?” I think you are really questionong the National Park Service’s right to institute these rules. Unfortunately for anarchists like you, they have the right to do so allowing more people to enjoy the parks.

  2. Aštar Šeran Avatar
    Aštar Šeran

    Finally some place where I have advantage using my pentapod

    1. Mark Niebauer Avatar
      Mark Niebauer

      Great Idea. The Pentapod sales should soar.

  3. Mars Johnson Avatar
    Mars Johnson

    This actually makes sense for photography workshops and it only appears to apply to trails. It seems like they’re just trying to keep the park accessible for other people on the trails and to prevent other people from having to wade through a sea of tripods. From the regulations –> “The use of tripods on trails is prohibited by permittees or clients (monopods are authorized). Tours must not interfere with the general visiting public.”

  4. Tom Herriman Avatar
    Tom Herriman

    Reading is soooo damn difficult.

    Workshops can’t use tripods on the trails, but workshops are allowed to leave the trails; up to 100 ft.