This is what happens when you shoot portraits with infrared cameras

Jan 16, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

This is what happens when you shoot portraits with infrared cameras

Jan 16, 2018

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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Infrared photography can give some unique images with some kind of an unworldly feel. Mathieu Stern wanted to see what it would look like to take portraits with this technique. He converted two cameras to shoot infrared, but they capture different wavelength. With a little help from his friends, he took some portraits with the converted camera, as well as a regular one. He has shared the results with us, and they are really interesting.

YouTube video

Mathieu’s friend Vincent used a camera that was modified by removing a layer of the sensor, so it only sees infrared. As Mathieu explains, he did nothing to the footage so that’s why it’s white and blueish.

Another friend, Pierre Louis, did the same thing to his camera. However, he added a filter that is less selective, taking a little of the wavelength of normal light back. Therefore, he got more details on the plants. He was later able to change the color in Photoshop to get a pleasing red Aréochrome effect. In its final version, his images look pinkish to red, and I particularly like this effect.

As for Mathieu, he used a regular camera and took “normal photos” to have a comparison. He warns that modifying your camera for IR is not an easy thing to do. You may need someone to help you if you decide to take this step. Also, have in mind that your camera will be definitely changed for IR if you convert it and you will not be able to take regular photos again. So, don’t use your favorite camera for IR conversion.

If you’re willing to experiment, here’s a guide for converting a Canon EOS 550D to shoot infrared. If you’d rather not spill out your camera’s guts, you can play with filters instead. Take a look at more photos Mathieu and his friends took and don’t forget to watch the video for more interesting examples.

[This is What Happens When You use INFRARED CAMERAS for PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY | Mathieu Stern]

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Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic

Dunja Djudjic is a multi-talented artist based in Novi Sad, Serbia. With 15 years of experience as a photographer, she specializes in capturing the beauty of nature, travel, and fine art. In addition to her photography, Dunja also expresses her creativity through writing, embroidery, and jewelry making.

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4 responses to “This is what happens when you shoot portraits with infrared cameras”

  1. Tj Ó Seamállaigh Avatar
    Tj Ó Seamállaigh

    This is what I’ve been doing for more than a year now (with my Canon EOS 7D). https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/eb62ccdb98af1ff63a07db61ae8ec7d9f0ef786cd7046d48386e96d9ab043384.jpg

  2. Viggo Næss Avatar
    Viggo Næss

    I was just thinking about this and wonder if anyone here has tried it with an OCF (off camera flash) and can share any experiences, is it just happy shooting or are there something’s to overcome or consider compared to normal use. Thanks??

    1. Tj Ó Seamállaigh Avatar
      Tj Ó Seamállaigh

      Check my post in the comments below – this is a selfie taken with converted camera + speedlite.