Using Suction Pads To Secure Lightstands

Jul 8, 2015

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

Using Suction Pads To Secure Lightstands

Jul 8, 2015

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

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DIYP reader Maor Cohen of Kaveret sent us this sweet tip about using suction pads for securing light stands. It has some huge benefits over carrying several kilos per stand in sand bags. Of course they are easier to carry, not as messy, and provide more security.

The idea is kinda self explanatory from the photo, but Maor sent us some more details about this hack. The suction pad used is a triple suction cup capable of carrying up to 309lb, and originally intended for lifting glass or fixing car dents. (you can also use a smaller double cup version which will support up to 130lb).  Next you will have to secure the base of the stand to the suction mount and make sure it is tight and this is it.

This specific  pad was tested in events several hours long and did not lose suction. Not bad for a $26 solution.

The obvious caveat is that you can only use those where you have a nice smooth clean floor (think dedicated venues, marble floor and basketball courts). For ‘regular’ outdoors, carpets, most hardwood floors and so on, it’s back to sand bags.

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P.S. if you don’t have any available ‘good floor’, you can double duty those to secure a small light to a window using a super clamp.

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Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh

Udi Tirosh is an entrepreneur, photography inventor, journalist, educator, and writer based in Israel. With over 25 years of experience in the photo-video industry, Udi has built and sold several photography-related brands. Udi has a double degree in mass media communications and computer science.

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8 responses to “Using Suction Pads To Secure Lightstands”

  1. Eva Duve Creel Avatar
    Eva Duve Creel

    Clever

  2. Morgana Creely Avatar
    Morgana Creely

    Great idea as long as you’re not on carpet ;)

  3. Petar Maksimovic Avatar
    Petar Maksimovic

    Because there is so much wind indoors…

    1. sam Avatar
      sam

      just too many people dancing….

    2. Maor Cohen Avatar
      Maor Cohen

      Nop , but by a drunken guest / or waiter / or small children that running around your gear, can accidentally knock down the tripod…

    3. Petar Maksimovic Avatar
      Petar Maksimovic

      Then it’s bound to brake even more awkwardly then if just fell…

    4. Maor Cohen Avatar
      Maor Cohen

      ok, when was the last time you seen light stand bends and breaks?
      I guess… never?

      there is no difference between the suction cups and the sandbags. nobody can accidentally knock them down’ and I won’t pass those two options and let my gear be at risk of falling down..
      i just figure.. that you are one of those people that just have deny everything, even if there is no reason.
      first comment that is not related to anything “so much wind indoors”
      how is it related? the umbrellas are used to diffuse the light, even if there is no wind and even if there were no umbrellas, I still I secures my gear professionally …

      and another thing, maybe you should doubt yourself before you respond ..
      because.. when you think about it, why should I post method that doesn’t work? I don’t earn anything from it.
      my solution is designed to help, I don’t earn money if you use it or not

  4. Pete Woods Avatar
    Pete Woods

    Sure, I can see this is certainly a better alternative to sand bags. And I do agree as the posting stated there are surfaces where it wouldn’t be applicable, such as grass, carpet and similar surfaces. However when used on an appropriate surface the benefits are obvious. Anyhow, shows creative thinking and sharing the idea should be much appreciated.