This review of the DJI Mavic Mini focuses on its abilities as a filmmaking tool

Nov 26, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

This review of the DJI Mavic Mini focuses on its abilities as a filmmaking tool

Nov 26, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Perhaps it’s just that the DJI Mavic Mini is an impressive little drone, or maybe it’s the beautiful scenic views of Glencoe reminding me of my own visit there a couple of weeks ago, but this is one of the most complete Mavic 2 reviews I’ve seen so far that’s specifically geared towards photographers and filmmakers.

In this review, the guys at Drone Film Guide put the Mavic Mini through its paces, to push its capabilities and really see what this tiny 249g drone can pull off. Drone Film Guide concentrates more on the filmmaking side of things and less on the tech side of drones. But whenever a new drone comes out, it needs to be tested to find out where its filmmaking limits are.

For a $399 drone, the Mavic Mini produces some very impressive results, as you can see in the opening sequence for the review. Despite shooting only 2.7K at 40Mbps, even scaled up to 4K it looks very good. And weighing in at only 249g, it circumvents the need for drone registration in a number of countries, including the UK and USA.

They do note a few downsides, though. There’s no raw feature for photos, for a start, and shoots jpg only. This doesn’t necessarily mean that all your photos will be bad, it just means you need to think more about your shooting technique and settings because you won’t have that extra latitude in post that raw files offer. There’s also no 24fps option for shooting video, which is somewhat annoying, and exposure is automatic (although you can lock it!).

The DJI Fly app is also rather cut down and not as feature-packed as DJI Go 4. Despite a number of key features being missing, though, you can still do some of the compositing effects in post using other applications like Lightroom or Photoshop.

The review goes into a lot of depth into the different factors of the drone in the video, but overall, the footage speaks for itself. The DJI Mavic Mini is capable of producing some excellent footage if you take the time to think about how you fly and shoot it.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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