The DJI Mavic Air 2 is actually super easy to fix

May 25, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

The DJI Mavic Air 2 is actually super easy to fix

May 25, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

Share on:

YouTube video

The folks at iFixit have been working hard during the lockdown, including building a massive repository of repair information for ventilators and other devices to help those who need to repair life-saving equipment. But they’re also managing to keep up with their regular YouTube duties, too, still regularly posting teardowns and instructional videos to repair your personal devices.

Most recently, their latest video is the new DJI Mavic Air 2 drone; DJI’s follow-up to 2018’s popular Mavic Air. iFixit’s video takes the Mavic Air 2 apart to show how all of the major components fit together, and how easily they dismantle to provide access to pretty much every component contained within.

Of course, exactly how easy it will be for you to repair your Mavic Air 2 in the event that something happens to it will depend a lot on what might break for you. But assuming you can get hold of replacement components, everything comes easily apart, attached using just screws and a few cables. Nothing seems glued or welded into the case, and there are none of those plastic locking tabs to deal with.

While attempting to repair the drone yourself would likely destroy any warranty you may have left on the drone, if you’d prefer to try and fix it yourself then it doesn’t look like it would be that difficult at all – again, assuming you can get hold of the parts.

Filed Under:

Tagged With:

Find this interesting? Share it with your friends!

John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Join the Discussion

DIYP Comment Policy
Be nice, be on-topic, no personal information or flames.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *