Sony unveils two huge new 960GB and 1920GB Tough CFexpress cards

Jun 2, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Sony unveils two huge new 960GB and 1920GB Tough CFexpress cards

Jun 2, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Sony has announced two new large-capacity 960GB and 1920GB CFexpress Type A memory cards. The two new cards offer read speeds of up to 800MB/sec and write speeds of up to 700MB/sec. Their VPG 200 specification rating guarantees they’ll never drop below 200MB/sec sustained write speeds.

Like all of Sony’s Tough series memory cards, they feature a rugged and durable design. It lets them handle drops of up to 7.5 metres (a little over 24ft). They can take up to 150 Newtons of impact force. And they can perform in temperatures ranging from a chilly -10°C up to 70°C (14-158°F). The cards also possess an IP57. This means they can survive drops in water up to 1 metre in depth for at least half an hour.

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The successor to XQD, CFexpress has become the norm for most cameras on today’s market. It replaces both XQD and CFast 2.0. Most cameras, however, use CFexpress Type B cards. These are CFexpress Type A, though. This means can pretty much only use them in Sony cameras. But, in those Sony cameras, the speeds these cards offer should allow you to keep up with the footage demands. And their large capacities mean you can shoot a lot of it before they get full, too.

The two new 960GB and 1920GB cards are part of the CEA-M series of cards from Sony. They match the same maximum read and write speeds of Sony’s CEA-G series cards, also released under the company’s “Tough” product line. The CEA-G cards, though, conform to the VPG 400 specification, meaning sustained write speeds will never fall below 400MB/sec. The CEA-G cards also max out at much lower capacities, starting at 80GB and capping out at 640GB.

So, if your camera doesn’t need more than 200MB/sec (1600Mbps) write speeds but you need a lot of space, the new CEA-M series make more sense. Even at the maximum 200MB/sec bitrate, you’re still going to get about an hour and a half of footage on the smaller 960GB card and around three hours on the larger 1920GB card.

Price and Availability

The Sony Tough CFexpress Type-A CEA-M series cards are available to to pre-order now in 960GB capacity for $749.99 and in 1920GB capacity for $1,399. Shipping begins on June 19th.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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One response to “Sony unveils two huge new 960GB and 1920GB Tough CFexpress cards”

  1. Mark Sampson Avatar
    Mark Sampson

    Overpriced