Sony RX100 VII sensor isn’t as good as previous generation models, DxO mark says

Feb 10, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Sony RX100 VII sensor isn’t as good as previous generation models, DxO mark says

Feb 10, 2020

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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The Sony RX100 VII is the latest in Sony’s line of popular RX100 compact cameras. DxOMark recently posted their review of the RX100 VII’s sensor in Sony’s latest iteration and found it to be a little lacking compared to previous generations.

Released in July 2019, the RX100 VII is an update to the RX100 VI. It was a welcome update, particularly for vloggers thanks to the addition of the microphone socket. It features the same 24-200mm equivalent lens introduced in the RX100 VI, but it also came with a new stacked BSI CMOS sensor, which DxOMark says doesn’t stand up to the earlier model.

Aside from the microphone socket and the new sensor, the RX100 VII and RX100 VI are essentially the same camera, albeit with a $200 price difference.

  • 20MP 1-inch CMOS sensor
  • 24-200mm equivalent, f/2.8-4.5 stabilized zoom
  • Real-Time Tracking AF for stills and video
  • ISO 100-12,800, with expansion to ISO 64–25,600
  • Bursts at 90 fps, or up to 20 fps, blackout-free
  • 3-inch touchscreen
  • 4K UHD/30fps video, Full HD at up 120fps
  • Wi-Fi with Bluetooth and NFC

DxOMark gave the RX100 VII an overall score of 63, which is pretty disappointing. Especially so when the original Sony RX100 released in 2012 scored 66. DxOMark says that they expected the RX100 VII to score closer to 70, which is what the Sony RX100 V scored.

DxOMark’s final conclusion doesn’t say that the sensor sucks, although it’s not really a glowing recommendation. The new sensor does come with some benefits, like real-time tracking AF, but still…

With sensors larger than those found in typical compacts, offering 20MP resolution and high image quality with low noise, and with dynamic range approaching that of some interchangeable-lens camera, the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 series has come to define an enthusiast’s advanced compact ever since it was introduced in 2012.

Although it doesn’t quite match the exceptional imaging performance of the previous generation of 1-inch type BSI CMOS sensor, the Sony RX100 VII’s newly-developed “stacked” sensor comes very close. With its built-in DRAM and enhanced PDAF providing a number of benefits, along with the Real-Time Tracking AF feature, it seems a fair tradeoff. All in all, with its new capabilities and solid image quality, the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VII looks like one of the most compelling compacts available.

Given DxOMark’s findings, that $200 price difference between the RX100 VII and RX100 VI is an awful lot of extra money to pay for a microphone jack and reduced image quality.

You can read the full review on the DxOMark website.

[via Sony Alpha Rumors]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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5 responses to “Sony RX100 VII sensor isn’t as good as previous generation models, DxO mark says”

  1. Michael Estwik Avatar
    Michael Estwik

    RX100 V has 70
    RX100 VI has 66
    RX100 VII has 63
    RX100 VIII will have 60?

  2. Mike Drips Avatar
    Mike Drips

    It’s the exact same sensor as in previous models, at least back to model V. DxOMark is full of crap. They don’t know anything about camera design, as they are unable to understand why a full sized sensor isn’t in this camera series.

    1. Fernando plus Avatar
      Fernando plus

      “exact same sensor” doesn’t mean exact performance, it could be tweaked in other way to benefict other aspects. For a proof just check the smartphones sensors, a lot share the same sensor with different results.
      Implementation matters.

  3. Stefano Giovannini Avatar
    Stefano Giovannini

    The autofocus is so good that you’ll get more sharp images because of that. The one step popup viewfinder will allow you to be ready to shoot faster and miss less images. It’s an expensive camera. But I love it. I sold the rx100 m3 that was hunting in af-c. I wish the lens was faster and the camera 300 dollars cheaper. But otherwise I am happy (bought it in December when it was 100 dollars off).

  4. Tugboat Avatar
    Tugboat

    Sony are bringing to many cameras out to fast, I sold the RXm3 to buy the m4, then 5 months latter m5 came out, same with the A6000 ,6300, 6500. The RX was ment to be a fun keep in your pocket blog camera, now it wants to be a something it’s not. Reminds me of the old Pentax, zoom cameras