SLR Lounge’s Impossible Things wants to AI your Lightroom

Jan 29, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

SLR Lounge’s Impossible Things wants to AI your Lightroom

Jan 29, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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In the last year or two, artificial intelligence has become the latest buzzword in the photography industry. From automatic background removal to full-on digital art creation, AI is changing the photography industry and creating new tools to help photographers in various aspects of their workflows.

A new AI photo editing company that recently entered the scene is Impossible Things, created by Lightroom preset makers, DVLOP, and photography educators, SLR Lounge. The AI claims to provide photographers with “an intuitive, powerful editing tool that enhances photos with speed, accuracy, and artistry.

In comparing Impossible Things to some of the other AI photo editors on the market, the two most relevant differentiators that it seems to be competing with are 1) that it works natively inside of Adobe Lightroom and 2) that it works with a user’s Lightroom presets. This might be a draw for photographers who don’t want to leave Lightroom, or photographers who like the look of their existing Lightroom presets and want to use them in conjunction with AI.

How it Works

To use Impossible Things, photographers select the photos they want to edit in Lightroom, launch the Lightroom plugin, and then select the preset they want applied. The AI starts by applying the selected preset and then applies relative or absolute adjustments determined by the AI’s predictions over 38 individual sliders. So the result is a set of images with the initial preset look but with adjustments to sliders like exposure, noise reduction, white balance, and others.

Additional Features:

Besides the features listed above, here are some of the other tools and benefits that Impossible Things is hoping to compete within the increasingly crowded space of AI photo editing.

Artist Styles – The AI is trained and tuned with DVLOP’s existing presets, which were created with many of the industry’s leading photographers such as Jose Villa, Two Mann Studios, and India Earl. This also includes the presets they created with SLR Lounge called Visual Flow.

Camera Profiles – Impossible Things claims to have trained their AI with “over 1 million dngs, 200 unique camera models, and 300 different lenses” to account for (and minimize differences between) different camera makes and models.

Lighting Condition Based Development – The AI was trained with their patent pending system of development called “Lighting Condition Based Development (LCBD),” which makes predictions based on the different lighting conditions that many wedding, portrait and event photographers face.

Cloud Styles – For photographers that don’t own any presets, Impossible Things includes a library of “cloud styles” that give photographers access to a variety of popular looks.

Custom Tuning – To help guide and refine the final look, users can use their Custom Tuning feature, which saves the user’s personalized slider adjustments in the cloud for future edits from any computer. This is essentially their way of user training for the AI.

Adaptive Noise Reduction – The AI claims to apply “the perfect amount of luminance noise reduction to high ISO photos” based on the ISO and exposure correction.

Others – For more information on all of their features, they created an “under the hood” article on their blog to explain more details.

Pricing

Impossible Things is currently priced between $0.04/image to $0.06/image, depending on the subscription tier. They are also offering 500 free “edit credits” for those interested in trying it out. Find out more information on their website.

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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