Shot a person from below? Fix the perspective with a few clicks

Mar 12, 2017

Joseph Parry

Joseph Parry is a Commercial and Editorial photographer based in the UK that provides cinematic photography and ounces of humour. Follow him on Instagram for stories and kick ass imagery.

Shot a person from below? Fix the perspective with a few clicks

Mar 12, 2017

Joseph Parry

Joseph Parry is a Commercial and Editorial photographer based in the UK that provides cinematic photography and ounces of humour. Follow him on Instagram for stories and kick ass imagery.

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Something came to my attention recently thanks to some feedback from close friends. This was called “Fixing the Keystone” or “Keystoning” and it simply means making sure that your verticals are vertical and horizontals are horizontal.

A very simple concept and also one which architectural photographers will have been on top for decades.

Here’s how you can fix the problem in just a few clicks!

As a portrait/fashion photographer, it might not actually be something you think to fix when you’re caught up in the moment. With colour grading, spot healing and sharpening your images for clients it’s an easy thing for some of us to overlook.

Here’s a before and after:

First things first decide whether you’re going to fix this issue pre or post raw and use it either as the base file or the final product.

I prefer to fix it in post at the end of everything so that if I decide to change my mind later on, all of my healing and DB work isn’t wasted. I take the same approach with Liquify (though in some situations it makes sense to fix the file first to save yourself work later on).

If you’re fixing it in Lightroom or Photoshop (Capture One detailed below) you simply select the keystone icon and follow the steps below. To open the Adobe Camera Raw panel in Photoshop click on Filter>Camera Raw Filter.

Once at the raw processing screen click on the Keystone icon (1) and then the Guided button (2).

Now move your points (circled in red) to the outermost vertical and horizontal points within your images and watch the magic happen!

For Capture One users you can press “K” or click on the lens panel (1), then under the Keystone (2) area click the Keystone icon (3). Drag your points (4) to the outermost vertical and horizontal points and then click apply (5).

It’s a simple problem with a quick fix and just another tool to add to your bag when shooting. I hope this helps!

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Joseph Parry

Joseph Parry

Joseph Parry is a Commercial and Editorial photographer based in the UK that provides cinematic photography and ounces of humour. Follow him on Instagram for stories and kick ass imagery.

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10 responses to “Shot a person from below? Fix the perspective with a few clicks”

  1. john doe Avatar
    john doe

    Now for snapseed to offer something like this

    1. Joseph Parry Avatar
      Joseph Parry

      Yeah! That would be killer!

    2. Adrian J Nyaoi Avatar
      Adrian J Nyaoi

      Snapseed have perspective correction; not as good as LR or PS

      1. john doe Avatar
        john doe

        Yes but you have to eyeball it this one seems to do the job just by aligning things or that’s what I understood

  2. mike r Avatar
    mike r

    It should probably be pointed out that this only works if you have strong horizontal and vertical lines to use as reference points for your distortion (such as in the example). It’d be much trickier to use this technique if you photographed someone in an empty field.

    1. Paul Monaghan Avatar
      Paul Monaghan

      True but then without strong lines its going to be hard to notice the problem anyway :).

      1. Joseph Parry Avatar
        Joseph Parry

        True on both! ^^

  3. David Hovie Avatar
    David Hovie

    Why not use a shift lens?

    1. Paul Monaghan Avatar
      Paul Monaghan

      They are normally larger, more expensive and restricted to particular focal lenghts and not avaliable for all systems.

      Sure you could also mount your camera as a digital back to a full technical camera to get a full range of movements but then its starting to get a bit nuts :).

      This is quite a good and quick fix that could help people, if your planning on shooting lots of things that would require this sort of fix then getting a tilt/shift setup would be the way to go :)

      1. Joseph Parry Avatar
        Joseph Parry

        Exactly Paul <3