Nikon confirms some authorised retailers were selling counterfeit EN-EL15b batteries

May 28, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Nikon confirms some authorised retailers were selling counterfeit EN-EL15b batteries

May 28, 2019

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Last week, B&H emailed customers who’d purchased EN-EL15b batteries from them. They said that some of the batteries were “subpar”. It was suspected that this was a euphemism for fake, and according to a statement released by Nikon to DPReview, the suspicions were correct.

We have been made aware that some customers who purchased individual EN-EL15b batteries from authorized Nikon retailers received defective product. These batteries are not genuine and were not manufactured or distributed by Nikon USA. Concerned users can find a guide for determining if the battery they have purchased is a genuine Nikon battery at this link.

While many photographers have been using 3rd party batteries for years without issue, they’ve bought them knowingly. They’re advertised as 3rd party batteries and haven’t claimed to be the genuine article. Counterfeit batteries claiming to be Nikon originals, on the other hand, offer zero guarantees about what’s actually inside them. Nor is there anybody to come back to them in the event that they… Oh, I don’t know, do what lithium ion batteries occasionally do and blow up your camera or set fire to your house.

And don’t think it can’t happen (sure, the chances might be slim, but “can’t” is an absolute). If a company as big as Samsung can face issues over exploding batteries, how much do you think a company that puts the blame on Nikon cares about your kit and your safety? Or about how accurately they clone genuine Nikon batteries? This is why B&H has requested that you safely dispose of the batteries if you received some and not risk returning them.

So, get in touch with B&H if you’ve purchased one or several of the batteries (you should have an email, double check it’s not in your spam folder), and you will be issued with free replacements.

Nikon says that they have also received reports of fake EN-EL9a, EN-EL10 and EN-EL11 batteries, as well as others. If you’re not sure if a battery you have purchased is genuine, Nikon has a guide. Nikon’s statement also says “retailers”, although, besides B&H, I’ve yet to see a statement or email from other retailers regarding this issue. So, check Nikon’s guide if you’ve bought an EN-EL15b recently, just to be safe.

[via DPReview]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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11 responses to “Nikon confirms some authorised retailers were selling counterfeit EN-EL15b batteries”

  1. Dale L Allen Avatar
    Dale L Allen

    “The scientific process does not always get the right answer the first time, but if it’s working well, then important findings are reviewed and tested and the truth becomes clearer,”
    Social issues don’t respond to analysis, never have, never will.

    1. John Aldred Avatar
      John Aldred
  2. Marko Avatar
    Marko

    Please correct the mistake in your title, it’s ‘authorized’ not ‘authorised’. Cheers.

    1. udi tirosh Avatar
      udi tirosh

      that really depends on where you live
      https://grammarist.com/spelling/authorise-authorize/

      1. Marko Avatar
        Marko

        So it’s the the British way. OK. Cheers.

    2. Kaouthia Avatar
      Kaouthia

      Sorry, I speak (and write) the English they use in England. :)

      1. Marko Avatar
        Marko

        Well, after all, you invented big part of the English language.

  3. Volker Bartheld Avatar
    Volker Bartheld

    Nikon wants you to log in with some credentials if you follow the link mentioned in the article. https://www.nikonimgsupport.com/eu/BV_article?articleNo=000006187&configured=1&lang=en_GB should work without. At least from my location. From what I can see, those fakes are getting better and better. Pretty hard to distinguish. Time for some PKI crypto stuff to further raise the bar.

  4. Noajorspanos Avatar
    Noajorspanos

    B&H has been selling these fake batteries for years. I bought some Canon LP-E6N from B&H that Canon replaced for me after I sent them a receipt from B&H. They wanted them to investigate where B&H was buying counterfeit batteries. I now shop at a local camera store that clearly has my best interests over making a few extra bucks. I am sure B&H isn’t alone as a friend had a similar problem with Adorama.

  5. kj wojnar Avatar
    kj wojnar

    My question is how did the retailers get the batteries in the first place ? Were they represented and genuine from a wholesaler or were these purchased outside the Nikon network ? Interesting that there is still no information on how they happened to be sold by B&H.

    Glad they at least did the honorable thing eventually in replacing the batteries. But still confused as to how this could happen that an authorized retailer could think the batteries coming from outside the wholesale network were legit. Or is this a Nikon wholesale network issue and nobody wants to admit it ?????

  6. kj wojnar Avatar
    kj wojnar

    I would like to know how the batteries came to be sold at B&H in the first place. Were they purchased through the Nikon wholesale network and the wholesaler misrepresented them ? Or is the issue with Nikon’s network itself.

    Glad B&H eventually took the appropriate steps to make things good but wonder if they knew they were selling non-Nikon batteries. Trust goes a long way but at some point i need to know if that trust is warranted.