Fuji Announces the X-T1 IR, the World’s First Infrared Mirrorless Camera

Aug 3, 2015

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

Fuji Announces the X-T1 IR, the World’s First Infrared Mirrorless Camera

Aug 3, 2015

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

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We’ve previously shared how you can convert your existing dSLR to shoot infrared images, but this approach is very touchy, technical, and would most assuredly void the warranty on your camera.  Fortunately, for those wanting to shoot IR photos, Fuji has just announced X-T1 IR, the first mirrorless infrared camera.

“The X-T1 IR focuses on both excellent image quality as well as delivering incredible speed. It uses an extremely fast and accurate autofocus system, and is compatible with Ultra High Speed UHS-II SD memory cards. At up to 8 frames per second, the X-T1 IR is fit for any specialized workplace in need of first-rate photo quality, durability and performance.” – Fuji Press Release

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This new model, scheduled for release in October, is built on the Fuji X-T1 platform and comes equipped with all of the original features.  The magnesium alloy body makes it a durable workhorse and is aimed at such specialized markets as crime scene investigation, healthcare diagnostics, and research laboratories.  And, because it stays true to the design of its predecessors, the X-T1 IR is fully compatible with the growing line of Fujinon XF lenses.

Fuji X-T1 IR Features

  • Captures light on the UV and IR spectrum from approximately 380nm – 1,000nm
  • 16.3 Megapixels APS-C X-Trans CMOS II Sensor
  • Dust and water-resistant body
  • Freeze resistance to 14°F (-10°C).
  • EXR Processor II
  • High-precision 2.36 million dot OLED viewfinder
  • Viewfinder magnification of 0.77x
  • Wide viewing angle
  • Ultra-fast Real Time Viewfinder with a lag-time of 0.005sec (less than 1/10 of existing models)
  • Tempered glass 1.04 million dot high-precision 3” tilting LCD monitor
  • Digital Split Image and Focus Highlight Peaking
  • Electronic shutter with speeds up to 1/32000 seconds
  • ISO200 – 6400, extended ISO 100, 12800, 25600
  • Interval timer shooting for Time Lapse photography is available with intervals of 1 second to 24 hours and up to 999 frames
  • Full HD video 1080p at 60fps
  • Video frame rates of 50fps, 30fps, 25fps, and 24fps

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While I have never experimented with infrared photography (and, honestly, don’t see that happening in the new future), this could be a huge advancement for specialized fields that put it to use on a daily basis.  These markets will now be able to take advantage of the technological advancements sweeping the mirrorless world without having to modify equipment or, worse yet, rely on outdated or faulty gear.

And, of course, the more traditional photographer will now not have to Frankenstein their camera to get a decent IR photo.

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The projected ticket price of just under $1,700 should put the X-T1 IR well within the budgets of most departments using infrared imaging.  And, with its silent shutter technology, investigators will no longer have to worry about disturbing the spirits of the deceased who may still be lingering around a crime scene.

[via Digital Photography Review]

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Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery

Allen Mowery is a Nationally-published Commercial & Editorial Photographer with over 20 years of experience. He has shot for major brands as well small clients. When not shooting client work or chasing overgrown wildlife from his yard, he loves to capture the stories of the people and culture around him.

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8 responses to “Fuji Announces the X-T1 IR, the World’s First Infrared Mirrorless Camera”

  1. mike Avatar
    mike

    Wow that is expensive. You can get an infrared conversion for pretty much any mirrorless or dslr camera for pretty cheap. Stick an IR-only filter on it and you are good to go. I have a cheap E-PL1 with this conversion.

  2. Azety Photographe Avatar
    Azety Photographe

    WOW. PHOTOGRAPHERS WERE WAITING FOR THIS CAMERA SINCE 20 YEARS !!! THANKS GOD FUJI IS DOING EVERYTHING WE NEED ! PLEASE NEXT TIME TRY A MIRRORLESS CAMERA WITH COFFEE MACHINE

  3. Ago Pelisaar Avatar
    Ago Pelisaar

    Sigma DSLR-s have always been easy to convert to IR purposes and back to normal shooting. Just pop out the IR blocking filter in front of the sensor and you have IR sensitive camera, when done – you can put the IR blockin filter back. So Fuji is not the first camera nor the cheapest alternative. It may have a point for those who already use Fuji system.

  4. cameradoll Avatar
    cameradoll

    Price tag would be great if it were full frame too..

      1. cameradoll Avatar
        cameradoll

        I am referring more to the pricing being more in line with full frame..

  5. nathanphotographer Avatar
    nathanphotographer

    Where did you get this info? There is NOTHING on Fuji’s website, which seems odd (at least that I can find).

  6. Michael Osborne Avatar
    Michael Osborne

    Yea I can’t buy it now because I’m not Military or Law enforcement, I’m just an artist that loves IR photography. I guess there is a very slim chance that in the right light with the right filter I might see through a chicks shirt. If I wanted to be a perv I would by all the spy cameras I can afford not an IR camera.