Five essential tips for shooting in new locations

Jul 24, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Five essential tips for shooting in new locations

Jul 24, 2023

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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Most of my photography is outdoors. As such, I’m always looking for new locations. Sometimes I spend a day location scouting, specifically to find new places to photograph. Sometimes, I just get lucky on a random day out somewhere.

When you’re going somewhere new, it’s difficult to know what to shoot. It’s easy to miss the good stuff. Here’s five essential tips from Adam Gibbs that can help make your new location blues disappear.

The list might sound pretty tough at first. The opener alone doesn’t seem all that optimistic. But it is a realistic list of things to consider when exploring a new location. They’re all about making the most out of each location and how you can get the best results from it.

  • 1:25 – Keep your expectations low
  • 2:40 – Maximise your time in an area
  • 5:15 – Get to know an area – stick around
  • 8:30 – Look for subjects that go with the light
  • 8:55 – Make sure to review your images on a bigger screen

That last one can be difficult if you’re only at the location briefly one time, as may be the case for travel photography. But if you can look at the images on a larger screen, do it. I find the iPad is often the easiest way to view images bigger right after a shoot. I’ve worked that way since Apple introduced the Retina display into the iPad series with the iPad 3rd Gen. It’s a fantastic shoot companion.

There are some great tips in this video in between each of the major points above. It’s well worth a watch if you want to get more from your travel, vacation or landscape photos!

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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