Drone films photographer’s incredible crawl through mud to rescue an eagle

Aug 19, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

Drone films photographer’s incredible crawl through mud to rescue an eagle

Aug 19, 2016

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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For some of us, just seeing a white-tailed eagle in the wild would be a treat. Polish wildlife photographer Krzysztof Chomicz has seen plenty. Lately, he saw one in a situation he didn’t like, drowning in thick mud.

Without hesitation, he went out to save it. This isn’t the first time, either. Chomicz rescued another white-tailed eagle last year from a similar predicament. This time, the whole ordeal was caught on a drone’s camera.

YouTube video

Crawling out hundreds of feet through the mud has got to be a tiring experience. Having to then crawl back with a big heavy eagle in tow must be just exhausting. But, when you see a situation like this, what else is one to do?

With the eagle now safely out of the mud, it went on to receive a shower and some food. The story continues about 3 minutes into this video.

YouTube video
YouTube video

As for the eagle. Well, he may not appear happy, but he is alive.

not_a_happy_bird

Local media reports that the eagle, nicknamed Icarus, was determined well enough to release back into the wild a few days later.

White-tailed eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla) are northern Europe’s largest bird of prey. They were driven to near extinction due to pollution and habitat loss. In the 1980s, though, they began making a comeback after PDBs and DDT were banned. Today there are thought to be almost 25,000 adult white-tailed eagles in Europe.

To find yourself in this situation even once is pretty rare. Twice? That’s just crazy odds. I’d like to think I’d do the same in his situation, though.

How about you? Have you found yourself rescuing wildlife in need while out shooting? Tell us what happened in the comments.

[via National Geographic]

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John Aldred

John Aldred

John Aldred is a photographer with over 20 years of experience in the portrait and commercial worlds. He is based in Scotland and has been an early adopter – and occasional beta tester – of almost every digital imaging technology in that time. As well as his creative visual work, John uses 3D printing, electronics and programming to create his own photography and filmmaking tools and consults for a number of brands across the industry.

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2 responses to “Drone films photographer’s incredible crawl through mud to rescue an eagle”

  1. Simon Ade Avatar
    Simon Ade

    Its just so good to see the human heart doing the right thing. This made my day.

  2. gtvone Avatar
    gtvone

    Good on that bloke.